Paula Osenni

CFP®
Personal Finance, Retirement, Lifestage Based Planning
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“With over 25 years of experience in the financial industry, Paula Osenni inspires clients to think outside the box about mid life transitions. She curates tools to guide them to what's possible; and coaches them to their best Second Act!”
Firm:

Act2 Transition Resources

Job Title:

Founder and Owner

Biography:

Paula Ferro Osenni founded Act 2 Transitions in 2016 after a 25-year career in financial Services. As a Financial Advisor at Ameriprise Financial, Paula helped clients reach their goals in the areas of Retirement, Education, Investing and Estate Planning. She consistently achieved high client satisfaction scores, and was named a Top Wealth Manager in Hudson Valley Magazine her last 3 years in practice.

Paula is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP), has a Master’s Degree in Finance and is member of the Financial Planning Association, the Kinder Institute of Life Planning and the National Association of Professional Women. She created her Second Act by combining her fascination with mid-life transitions and her financial planning skills to help others see the possibilities in their own life in the space between working and retirement. A frequent attendee at Kripalu Yoga Center and Omega Institute, Paula draws on many modalities in her coaching work, helping others to blend the “zen” of inner wisdom with the practical realities of their real lives to craft their own unique Act 2!

Paula has been married to her husband, Dan, for 35 years. They reside in the beautiful Hudson Valley of New York. They have two children, Brion and Nick. Outside of the office, Paula enjoys gardening, reading self-help and historical fiction books, and listening to music. She enjoys biking on country roads in the fall and visiting new places and cultures.

Education:

MA, Business & Finance, State University of New York Empire State College
BA, Business, Political Science, Labor Relations, Niagara University

Fee Structure:

Fee only advisor providing transition coaching/planning.

CRD Number:

2321203

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December 2016
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    Retirement Savings, Investing, IRAs
Is selling covered calls considered a high risk strategy to generate retirement income?
100% of people found this answer helpful

Selling covered calls is actually a pretty conservative strategy to get income. You know going in what your sell price will be, what your premium will be, and how long you have to wait. If you own the stock (a "covered" position), the only real risk is that of the price going down, in which case you are stuck with the "loss" and you will lose your buyer. But you keep the premium so it actually reduces your exposure to the extent of the premium received! The risky part is that you are owning stocks that can fluctuate wildly, regardless of the option. And, unlike some options whereby you can actually lose more that your investment, covered calls limit your losses to your cost basis in the stock. Just be careful about your premium price. Since you will have to hold the position for the duration (that is why I prefer 6 mos calls),you want to be compensated for that fact. If you trade volatile stocks that you would normally not hold without calls, you could rack up losses pretty quickly. Stick to small positions in solid stuff you know, and shorter terms, don't get too greedy, and you should do fine.

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