What you pay for your apartment and how fancy it is depends on your negotiation and deal-finding skills. However, before you negotiate anything, you've got to decide what you're looking for in your rented space. Read on for six steps to help you find an apartment for the lowest possible rental rate. (Are you confused about whether you should rent or buy? Read To Rent or Buy? The Financial Issues.)

No. 1: Seek Web Help in Picking Features
If you don't know what features are available in your area, try exploring the websites of online apartment locator services. You can search for apartments based simply on whether you want a one- or two-bedroom apartment or by other features. It's a great way to find out both what your pad will cost and what neighborhoods have the features you want.

No. 2: Avoid Choosing a Home Based on Perceived Value
You can get a great deal on an apartment with vaulted ceilings and an island kitchen, but the neighborhood may not be what you're looking for, or it's missing other things that topped your list of desired features. Don't make the mistake of renting an apartment because it seems like a good deal according to someone else's needs but not a good deal based on your needs.

No. 3: Call a Locator in Your Area
Look online or in a physical phone book for numbers for apartments in your area.

  • Call at least two and ask about which rental communities and neighborhoods have the most features that you want within your price range.
  • Ask about specials. You may be able to find an apartment that would normally go for $1,000 a month for $800 per month.
  • Because the locator will get a commission if you choose a property he or she recommends, make sure the locator calls ahead to see if the two to three properties you like have the best units available.

No. 4: Always Call a Community Before Visiting
Before you visit a property, call before visiting to get a quote on prices. Once you are on the property, the leasing agent may hope to wow you with features, but on the phone it's all about the numbers. Compare the figures you received from your locator with the number you gathered from online and local apartment locator services.

No. 5: Tour Properties in Person
While virtual tours can be found on most apartment complexes' websites, there's no substitute for visiting a community in person. Websites will provide an idea of what the community and interior look like, and should be used as an initial screen. Walking around your potential new neighborhood and apartment will give you a better feel for the location, Also, don't limit the search to one property; visit at least two, so that you have a comparison.

No. 6: Reevaluate Your Feature List
During the very first step of the process of finding a fabulous new place to live that's also easy on your wallet, you developed a list of what features that are important to you in and around your new home. You should have also decided what you are willing to pay for them. Now that you have at least a couple different properties to choose, see if you still hold the same values. Adjust your list accordingly as to what each feature is worth before doing your final comparisons of cost versus home value.

Once you know what you want and what it will cost, sit down and think about your choices in the following two ways:

  • Look at your actual budget. Consider whether one apartment would leave you with more money left over.
  • Evaluate an apartment's worth based on the sum of values you haves assigned to the features from your list. Make sure the actual rent you pay is within reason for what you can afford.

Knowing you have an actual value for what's important to you will enable you to make a decision on where you live based on your own needs instead of a community advertisement.

For other ideas on affording your rent, read Easy Ways To Cut Rental Costs and Are You Ready to Rent?

Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    Is An Ivy League Degree Worth It?

    In 600 B.C. Aesop determined that a bird in the hand was worth two in the bush. Warren Buffett claims that this axiom can be used to determine the most valuable uses of capital. In this article ...
  2. Savings

    Should You Look at 529 Plans Outside Your State?

    529 savings plans are not restricted by geography. So if your in-state offering has high fees or poor investment choices, look elsewhere.
  3. Investing

    4 Billionaires Who Dropped Out of Harvard

    People who became successful despite dropping out of Harvard University.
  4. Credit & Loans

    Student Financial Aid Changes: FAFSA 2015-2016

    Here is a look at some of the major changes to FAFSA in 2015 - 2016 and how they will affect student financial aid.
  5. Credit & Loans

    What to Do When You Can't Repay Your Student Loans

    Student loans should be kept in good standing no matter what. Here are some tips on managing your loans.
  6. Credit & Loans

    Student Loan Deferment: Live to Pay Another Day

    Extending your principal repayment date can increase your chances of fighting off default.
  7. Credit & Loans

    An Introduction to Student Loans and the FAFSA

    Learn how to fill out the FAFSA form so that it is easier for you to fund your education.
  8. Professionals

    Consider A Career As A Financial Communications Professional

    Regulators, sales people and clients all look to communications professionals to help them navigate the markets.
  9. Budgeting

    The True Cost of Attending College

    In addition to tuition, there are other college expenses that could potentially add thousands of dollars a year to the cost of an education
  10. Investing

    Undervalued Real Esate at Forestar Group

    Activists move to unlock the value of Forestar Group.
  1. Does renters insurance cover storage units?

    An all-perils renters insurance policy provides coverage for the contents of storage units. Most policies limit the amount ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Does renters insurance cover mold?

    An all-perils renters insurance policy typically provides a low set amount of coverage for damage caused by mold as long ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Does renters insurance cover dog bites?

    A renters insurance policy typically provides liability coverage, up to policy limits, for dog bites unless the coverage ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Does renters insurance cover theft?

    An all-perils renters insurance policy provides worldwide theft coverage for personal property after a claim exceeds the ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Does renters insurance cover moving?

    An all-perils renters insurance policy covers damage to items resulting from a covered peril during a move. Limitations and ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How much renters insurance do you need?

    You should have enough renters insurance coverage to replace lost or damaged items with new ones. On average, renters have ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bar Chart

    A style of chart used by some technical analysts, on which, as illustrated below, the top of the vertical line indicates ...
  2. Bullish Engulfing Pattern

    A chart pattern that forms when a small black candlestick is followed by a large white candlestick that completely eclipses ...
  3. Cyber Monday

    An expression used in online retailing to describe the Monday following U.S. Thanksgiving weekend. Cyber Monday is generally ...
  4. Take A Bath

    A slang term referring to the situation of an investor who has experienced a large loss from an investment or speculative ...
Trading Center