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Warren Buffett never had the intention of going to college. By age 13, he was managing his own business as a paperboy. He ended up making over $5,000 (equivalent to $42,610 in the year 2000) delivering newspapers. However, his father urged him to attend the University of Pennsylvania for business.

Buffett enrolled himself in Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania at age 16 to study business. After two years of complaining that he knew more than his professors, he moved on to the University of Nebraska in Lincoln and finished his degree. He graduated from the University of Nebraska at age 19 with a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration.

Unhappy with educational stagnancy, Buffett applied to Harvard. After receiving a rejection letter from Harvard's business school, he researched Columbia University, where he found out Benjamin Graham worked. This was appealing to Buffett and he ended up attending Columbia University. He earned a Master of Science in economics from Columbia in 1951. Shortly after graduation from Columbia, Buffett attended the New York Institute of Finance for a short period of time.

In 1951 Buffett also became an investment salesman for Buffett-Falk & Company. He later became a securities analyst and a partner at Buffett Partnership, Ltd. By 1970, he had become the Chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, where he still works today. Headquartered in Buffett's hometown of Omaha, Nebraska, Berkshire Hathaway operates as one of the world's largest corporate investment firms. The company trades on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in two categories. The company wholly owns Dairy Queen, Fruit of the Loom, Helzberg Diamonds, GEICO, BNSF, FlightSafety International and NetJets. The company also owns a diverse range of other popular companies.

Though Buffett attended various reputable schools, he debates that higher education is not for everyone and that experience is just as important. Though Buffett received a sufficient education, he always had a knack for business. At age 6 he purchased packs of Coca-Cola and chewing gum and sold them door to door, thus turning a profit. By age 11, he was investing in stocks. He then went on to deliver newspapers and magazines, which earned him about $175 per month. In high school, Buffett began buying pinball machines and making money by placing the machines in popular shops for customers to play.

Buffett has advice for college students, which is to obtain at least one share of BRK.B. along with their first tuition check. He also recommends that graduates find job they would have if they were independently rich and could do whatever they wanted. This leads people to perform with passion, which in turn equates to monetary rewards and overall wealth.

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