A:

The "percentage off the 52-week high or low" refers to when a security's current price is relative to where it has traded over the last 52 weeks. This gives investors an idea of how much the security has moved in the last year and whether it is trading near the top, middle or bottom of the range.



For example, consider a stock that in the last year traded as high as $12.50, as low as $7.50, and is currently trading at $10. This means the stock is trading 20% below its 52-week high (1 – (10/12.50) = 0.20 or 20%) and 33% above its 52-week low ((10/7.50) - 1 = 0.33 or 33%). This number is calculated by finding the difference between the current price and the high or low price over the last year, then determining what percentage of the high or low this difference represents.



(To learn more, check out the Stock Basics Tutorial and Market Breadth: A Directory Of Internal Indicators.)



RELATED FAQS
  1. How can I use market breadth to my advantage?

    Market breadth is a study that compares the number of companies on a given exchange that have created new 52-week highs to ... Read Answer >>
  2. How do I calculate the percentage gain or loss for my portfolio when all of the stocks ...

    Finding the total percentage gain or loss on a portfolio requires a few simple calculations. First, you should understand ... Read Answer >>
  3. I don't understand how a stock has a trading price of 5.97, but when I buy it I have ...

    It might seem logical that the last traded price of a security is the price at which it would currently be trading, but this ... Read Answer >>
  4. Does working capital include marketable securities?

    Learn how marketable securities such as Treasury bills (T-bills) and commercial papers are part of current assets and the ... Read Answer >>
  5. Does the closing price have to equal the last price traded?

    Logically and theoretically, the last price traded should be the same as the closing price of a stock. However, the way we ... Read Answer >>
  6. How do you calculate the percentage gain or loss on an investment?

    Calculating the percentage change of your investment is quite easy. All it takes is a little bookkeeping and either a simple ... Read Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    5 Ways to Identify 2016 Dow Laggards

    These five simple methods will sort 2016 Dow components into leader and laggard lists, allowing analysis of broader market conditions.
  2. Stock Analysis

    3 Consumer Staples Stocks Near Their 52-Week Highs Worth Selling (MCD, SBUX)

    Discover three consumer staples stocks trading near their 52-week highs, and explore why it might be a good option to sell them in 2016.
  3. Stock Analysis

    3 Stocks Near Their 52-Week Lows

    Discover some stocks that are currently trading near their 52-week lows, which may be undervalued and offer a good buying opportunity for investors.
  4. Stock Analysis

    3 Industrials Stocks Near Their 52-Week Highs that Are Worth Selling (HON, GE)

    Identify three companies in the industrial sector whose stocks are trading near their 52-week highs and, therefore, might be worth selling.
  5. Stock Analysis

    3 Financials Stocks Near Their 52-Week Lows Worth Buying (AXP, DFS)

    Identify several financial sector stocks trading near their 52-week lows that might be worth buying.
  6. Stock Analysis

    The 2 Financial Stocks You'll Wish You Bought in 2015

    Learn about the financial sector and the companies that operate within the sector. Understand why the two best-performing finance stocks performed well in 2015.
  7. Stock Analysis

    3 Consumer Discretionary Stocks Near Their 52-Week Highs Worth Selling (MCD, SBUX)

    Understand why it's a good time to consider selling consumer discretionary stocks, particularly those trading near their 52-week highs.
  8. Stock Analysis

    3 Materials Stocks Near Their 52-Week Lows Worth Buying (AA, IP)

    Identify three promising materials stocks that might be worth buying in 2016 given fundamentals, valuations and the fact that they are trading near 52-week lows.
  9. Chart Advisor

    Avoid These Weak Sector ETFs (XLU, XLP)

    These three sector ETFs ranked worst in performance over the last week and last month.
  10. Stock Analysis

    3 Utilities Stocks Near Their 52-Week Highs Worth Selling (XEL, NEE)

    Identify three utility companies whose stocks are trading near their 52-week highs, and explore whether it is a good time to sell these stocks.
RELATED TERMS
  1. 52-Week High/Low

    The highest and lowest prices that a stock has traded at during ...
  2. 52-Week Range

    The lowest and highest prices at which a stock has traded in ...
  3. High-Low Index

    An index that seeks to provide confirmation of a market trend ...
  4. Market Breadth

    A technique used in technical analysis that attempts to gauge ...
  5. Hindenburg Omen

    A technical indicator named after the famous crash of the German ...
  6. Range

    A stock's low and high prices for a particular trading period, ...
Hot Definitions
  1. Physical Capital

    Physical capital is one of the three main factors of production in economic theory. It consists of manmade goods that assist ...
  2. Reverse Mortgage

    A type of mortgage in which a homeowner can borrow money against the value of his or her home. No repayment of the mortgage ...
  3. Labor Market

    The labor market refers to the supply and demand for labor, in which employees provide the supply and employers the demand. ...
  4. Demand Curve

    The demand curve is a graphical representation of the relationship between the price of a good or service and the quantity ...
  5. Goldilocks Economy

    An economy that is not so hot that it causes inflation, and not so cold that it causes a recession. This term is used to ...
  6. White Squire

    Very similar to a "white knight", but instead of purchasing a majority interest, the squire purchases a lesser interest in ...
Trading Center