A:

The Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) requires companies to file earnings reports no later than 45 days after the end of their first three quarters, and their quarterly and annual reports 90 days after their fiscal year end. Companies file quarterly earnings reports on Form 10-Q or 10-QSB and yearly earnings reports on Form 10-K or 10-KSB. A company can file these reports or announce earnings publicly whenever it chooses, provided it follows the 45- and 90-day guidelines set forth by the SEC.

However, in an attempt to make information available to the public in a more timely manner, the SEC adopted rules on August 27, 2002, that saw these 45- and 90-day requirements reduced to 35 and 60 days, respectively. The tightening of filing requirements, however, affects only public companies that have a public float of at least $75 million and have been subject to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 for at least 12 months. The change in time periods was phased in over three years, starting November 15, 2002. For the first year, companies were allowed the 45- and 90-day requirements, then 40- and 75-day requirements the second year, and then 35- and 60-day requirements for the years thereafter.

Many websites have the release dates for earnings reports of publicly traded companies.

RELATED FAQS
  1. Why do companies postpone earnings announcements?

    During the course of a fiscal year, a company will report earnings on a total of four separate occasions: three quarterly ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between a quarter and a year in finance?

    Examine the difference between a fiscal quarter and a fiscal year. Learn why investors examine both quarterly and annual ... Read Answer >>
  3. What are the differences between a 10-K report and a firm's own annual report?

    Understand the key differences between a corporation's own annual report and its 10-K report filed with the SEC and how investors ... Read Answer >>
  4. When does a business report gross margins?

    Learn how gross margins are calculated and when publicly traded companies release these figures. Explore consensus street ... Read Answer >>
  5. When does Q2 start for most companies?

    Learn about the fiscal year of different companies and when the second quarter begins. Explore why analysts often prefer ... Read Answer >>
  6. What is a quarterly report?

    Learn about quarterly reports and why they are important to investors. Explore street consensus estimates and how reported ... Read Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Taxes

    How A Company Files With The SEC

    Filing with the SEC is not as complicated as you might thing -- just be meticulous about following the steps.
  2. Investing

    SEC Filings: Forms You Need To Know

    The forms companies are required to file provide a clear view of their histories and progress.
  3. Investing

    How To Decode A Company's Earnings Reports

    Read between the lines to decipher a company's true financial condition.
  4. Personal Finance

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  5. Investing

    What is a Public Company?

    A public company has sold stock to the public through an initial public offering (IPO) and that stock is currently traded on a public stock exchange.
  6. Investing

    Data Mining For Investors

    Being an informed investor is extremely important, but where and how do you get the data for your research?
  7. Financial Advisor

    SEC Enforcement Actions Dip Below 2015 Record

    The number of enforcement actions brought by the SEC this year is below the record in 2015.
  8. Insights

    Is This the End of Quarterly Earnings Reports?

    The SEC has issued a concept release calling for public comment on the requirement to submit quarterly earnings. Depending on the feedback, the practice may end.
  9. Investing

    The Annual Report Is a Public Company's Obligation

    The annual report is a yearly publication that public corporations provide to shareholders to describe the company’s operations and financial condition.
RELATED TERMS
  1. SEC Form 10-KSB

    A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), also ...
  2. SEC Form 10-Q

    A comprehensive report of a company's performance that must be ...
  3. SEC Form 15

    A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), also ...
  4. SEC Form SB-2

    A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) required ...
  5. SEC Form 10-KT

    A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that ...
  6. SEC Form NSAR-BT

    An annual filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission ...
Hot Definitions
  1. Five Cs Of Credit

    A method used by lenders to determine the credit worthiness of potential borrowers. The system weighs five characteristics ...
  2. Straddle

    An options strategy in which the investor holds a position in both a call and put with the same strike price and expiration ...
  3. Trickle-Down Theory

    An economic idea which states that decreasing marginal and capital gains tax rates - especially for corporations, investors ...
  4. North American Free Trade Agreement - NAFTA

    A regulation implemented on Jan. 1, 1994, that eventually eliminated tariffs to encourage economic activity between the United ...
  5. Agency Theory

    A supposition that explains the relationship between principals and agents in business. Agency theory is concerned with resolving ...
  6. Treasury Bill - T-Bill

    A short-term debt obligation backed by the U.S. government with a maturity of less than one year. T-bills are sold in denominations ...
Trading Center