A:

The Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) requires companies to file earnings reports no later than 45 days after the end of their first three quarters, and their quarterly and annual reports 90 days after their fiscal year end. Companies file quarterly earnings reports on Form 10-Q or 10-QSB and yearly earnings reports on Form 10-K or 10-KSB. A company can file these reports or announce earnings publicly whenever it chooses, provided it follows the 45- and 90-day guidelines set forth by the SEC.

However, in an attempt to make information available to the public in a more timely manner, the SEC adopted rules on August 27, 2002, that saw these 45- and 90-day requirements reduced to 35 and 60 days, respectively. The tightening of filing requirements, however, affects only public companies that have a public float of at least $75 million and have been subject to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 for at least 12 months. The change in time periods was phased in over three years, starting November 15, 2002. For the first year, companies were allowed the 45- and 90-day requirements, then 40- and 75-day requirements the second year, and then 35- and 60-day requirements for the years thereafter.

Many websites have the release dates for earnings reports of publicly traded companies.

RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the disclosure requirements for a private placement?

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has set forth disclosure requirements for private placements, including ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What role does the Inspector General play with the Securities and Exchange Commission?

    The inspector general of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) oversees, audits and conducts investigations of ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How long does it take to execute an M&A deal?

    Even the simplest merger and acquisition (M&A) deals are challenging. It takes a lot for two previously independent enterprises ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How often should a small business owner go through a bank reconciliation process?

    Small business owners should go through the bank reconciliation process at least monthly, and many business consultants recommend ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Term

    What are Non-GAAP Earnings?

    Non-GAAP earnings are a company’s earnings that are not reported according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.
  2. Investing News

    Mexican Energy, Telecom Reforms Please Foreign Investors

    Two years into his first term, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto is following through on radical campaign promises he made to Mexican citizens for sweeping multi-industry reform.
  3. Investing

    Top Cities Where Airbnb Is Legal Or Illegal

    Thinking of subletting your apartment on Airbnb? Make sure that you meet your city's regulations first.
  4. Credit & Loans

    What's a Nonperforming Loan?

    A nonperforming loan is any borrowed sum where the borrower has failed to pay scheduled payments for at least 90 days.
  5. Economics

    Understanding Cost of Revenue

    The cost of revenue is the total costs a business incurs to manufacture and deliver a product or service.
  6. Economics

    Understanding Cash and Cash Equivalents

    Cash and cash equivalents are items that are either physical currency or liquid investments that can be immediately converted into cash.
  7. Economics

    Explaining Carrying Cost of Inventory

    The carrying cost of inventory is the cost a business pays for holding goods in stock.
  8. Investing

    How To Calculate Minority Interest

    Minority interest calculations require the use of minority shareholders’ percentage ownership of a subsidiary, after controlling interest is acquired.
  9. Term

    Understanding the Maintenance Margin

    A maintenance margin is the minimum amount of equity that must be kept in a margin account.
  10. Credit & Loans

    Co-signing a Loan? Make Sure You Know The Risks

    Contractually, co-signers are just as responsible for the loan as the person actually borrowing the money. Be careful not to put yourself at risk.
RELATED TERMS
  1. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the ...
  2. Receivables Turnover Ratio

    An accounting measure used to quantify a firm's effectiveness ...
  3. International Financial Reporting Standards - IFRS

    A set of international accounting standards stating how particular ...
  4. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a ...
  5. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  6. Equity

    The value of an asset less the value of all liabilities on that ...

You May Also Like

Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!