An interest rate swap involves the exchange of cash flows between two parties based on interest payments for a particular principal amount. However, in an interest rate swap, the principal amount is not actually exchanged. In an interest rate swap, the principal amount is the same for both sides of the currency and a fixed payment is frequently exchanged for a floating payment that is linked to an interest rate, which is usually LIBOR.

A currency swap involves the exchange of both the principal and the interest rate in one currency for the same in another currency. The exchange of principal is done at market rates and is usually the same for both the inception and maturity of the contract.


n general, both interest rate and currency swaps have the same benefits for a company. Essentially, these derivatives help to limit or manage exposure to fluctuations in interest rates or to acquire a lower interest rate than a company would otherwise be able to obtain. Swaps are often used because a domestic firm can usually receive better rates than a foreign firm.

For example, suppose company A is located in the U.S. and company B is located in England. Company A needs to take out a loan denominated in British pounds and company B needs to take out a loan denominated in U.S. dollars. These two companies can engage in a swap in order to take advantage of the fact that each company has better rates in its respective country. These two companies could receive interest rate savings by combining the privileged access they have in their own markets.

Swaps also help companies hedge against interest rate exposure by reducing the uncertainty of future cash flows. Swapping allows companies to revise their debt conditions to take advantage of current or expected future market conditions. As a result of these advantages, currency and interest rate swaps are used as financial tools to lower the amount needed to service a debt.

Currency and interest rate swaps allow companies to take advantage of the global markets more efficiently by bringing together two parties that have an advantage in different markets. Although there is some risk associated with the possibility that the other party will fail to meet its obligations, the benefits that a company receives from participating in a swap far outweigh the costs.

For further reading, see Corporate Use Of Derivatives For Hedging and How does the foreign-exchange market trade 24 hours a day?

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