Unfortunately, this can be a little difficult as CUSIP numbers are owned and created by the American Bankers Association and operated by Standard & Poor's. To get access to the whole database of CUSIP numbers, which mainly cover U.S. and Canadian equities along with U.S. government and corporate debt, you will need to pay a fee to Standard & Poor's or a similar service that has access to the database.

However, while gaining access to a CUSIP number has been difficult in the past, there are now a few resources that can be used to access CUSIP numbers. The first is that individual companies will often display their CUSIP numbers to investors on their websites.

But the easiest way to gain access to this is through the active quote search on the Fidelity Investments website. You do not need to be a member or have an account. Simply enter the company you are looking for and the CUSIP will be displayed for you. For example, if you are looking for the CUSIP for Ford Motor Company just enter the name of the company and the CUSIP number will be shown (345370860).

To learn more, see What is a CUSIP number?

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