What are the advantages and disadvantages for a company going public?

A:

An initial public offering (IPO) is the first sale of stock by a company. Small companies looking to further the growth of their company often use an IPO as a way to generate the capital needed to expand. Although further expansion is a benefit to the company, there are both advantages and disadvantages that arise when a company goes public.

There are many advantages for a company going public. As said earlier, the financial benefit in the form of raising capital is the most distinct advantage. Capital can be used to fund research and development, fund capital expenditure or even used to pay off existing debt. Another advantage is an increased public awareness of the company because IPOs often generate publicity by making their products known to a new group of potential customers.

Subsequently this may lead to an increase in market share for the company. An IPO also may be used by founding individuals as an exit strategy. Many venture capitalists have used IPOs to cash in on successful companies that they helped start-up.

Even with the benefits of an IPO, public companies often face many new challenges as well. One of the most important changes is the need for added disclosure for investors. Public companies are regulated by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 in regard to periodic financial reporting, which may be difficult for newer public companies. They must also meet other rules and regulations that are monitored by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). More importantly, especially for smaller companies, is the cost of complying with regulatory requirements can be very high. These costs have only increased with the advent of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Some of the additional costs include the generation of financial reporting documents, audit fees, investor relation departments and accounting oversight committees.

Public companies also are faced with the added pressure of the market which may cause them to focus more on short-term results rather than long-term growth. The actions of the company's management also become increasingly scrutinized as investors constantly look for rising profits. This may lead management to perform somewhat questionable practices in order to boost earnings.

Before deciding whether or not to go public, companies must evaluate all of the potential advantages and disadvantages that will arise. This usually will happen during the underwriting process as the company works with an investment bank to weigh the pros and cons of a public offering and determine if it is in the best interest of the company.

To learn more, see IPO Basics Tutorial, The Murky Waters Of The IPO Market, and Don't Forget To Read The Prospectus!

RELATED FAQS

  1. What's the difference between limited liability partnership and general partnership?

    Learn the differences between general partnerships and limited liability partnerships; each type has unique traits, benefits ...
  2. What is real estate underwriting?

    See how underwriters for major lenders scrutinize real estate loans and manage their risk, and learn the origin of the term ...
  3. How is a penny stock created?

    Understand how penny stocks are issued and regulated, and learn how these sometimes rewarding but always risky investments ...
  4. In an IPO, who is a greensheet distributed to and for what purpose?

    One of the most talked about documents that arises in the process of introducing a new issue is the greensheet. This is an ...
RELATED TERMS
  1. Roll-Up Merger

    A rollup (also known as a "roll up" or a "roll-up") ...
  2. Volcker Rule

    The Volcker rule separates investment banking, private equity ...
  3. Dog And Pony Show

    A colloquial term that generally refers to a presentation or ...
  4. Investment Bank - IB

    A financial intermediary that performs a variety of services. ...
  5. Red Herring

    A preliminary prospectus filed by a company with the Securities ...
  6. Glass-Steagall Act

    An act the U.S. Congress passed in 1933 as the Banking Act, which ...
Related Articles
  1. Navigating E-commerce: Alibaba, eBay ...
    Investing Basics

    Navigating E-commerce: Alibaba, eBay ...

  2. A Look Into The Secrets Of Venture Capitalism
    Entrepreneurship

    A Look Into The Secrets Of Venture Capitalism

  3. Why, How, Where and When Entrepreneurs ...
    Entrepreneurship

    Why, How, Where and When Entrepreneurs ...

  4. How Bank of America Holds 1/8 of All ...
    Stock Analysis

    How Bank of America Holds 1/8 of All ...

  5. JPMorgan Chase: Too Big (And Profitable) ...
    Stock Analysis

    JPMorgan Chase: Too Big (And Profitable) ...

Trading Center