A:

All of the companies traded on the Nasdaq have four-lettered tickers, which are representative of the actual company. For example, the ticker symbol for Nasdaq-traded Microsoft is MSFT. However, in some cases, a ticker symbol on the Nasdaq will have five letters where the fifth letter is an identifier symbol that tells market participants something about the company. Below is a list of all of the fifth-letter identifiers on the Nasdaq:

A- Class A Shares
B- Class B Shares
C- Issuer Qualification Exception (the company is not meeting all listing requirements but can remain on the exchange for the time being)
D- New Issue
E- Delinquent (in regard to SEC filings)
F- Foreign Issue
G- First Convertible Bond
H- Second Convertible Bond
I- Third Convertible Bond
J- Voting
K- Non-voting
M- Fourth Preferred Issue
N- Third Preferred Issue
O- Second Preferred Issue
P- First Preferred Issue
Q- Bankruptcy
R- Rights Issue
S- Shares of Beneficial Interest
T- Securities with warrants or rights
U- Units
V- When issued or when distributed (shares that are set to split or have another similar pending corporate actions)
W- Warrants
Y- American Depository Receipt
Z or L - Miscellaneous Situation (research is required to investigate the exact reason for the identifier being attached)

For more reading on this subject, see Understanding The Ticker Tape and The ABCs Of Stock Indexes.

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