A:

It's true that all mutual funds' tickers have an X at the end of their symbol. The reason for this is to distinguish between mutual fund tickers and other securities that also have ticker symbols (such as stocks and bonds). This way you will automatically recognize a mutual fund by the X at the end of its ticker.

Another example of this is a money market fund, which will be followed by two Xs.

Another reason behind the extra letter is that it allows for more ticker possibilities. If all securities in the market were restricted to a four-symbol ticker it would limit the overall number of possible combinations of tickers. By adding a classifying letter to a ticker symbol, such as an X, you greatly increase the number of possible tickers and available choices of tickers.

There are other characteristics among tickers that may be of interest. Stocks that trade on the NYSE will have three or less symbols and never more than that. However, tickers on the Nasdaq have four letters.

To read more on this subject, see Understanding The Ticker Tape or the frequently asked questions, What do all of the letters in a stock option ticker symbol mean? and My stock's ticker symbol recently changed, why is this?

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