I would like to invest in a dividend-paying stock. How can I find out which stocks pay dividends?

By Richard Loth AAA
A:

There are several accessible sources to help investors identify dividend-paying stocks. Here are a few we can recommend:

 

  • Generally, your local newspaper will only provide an abbreviated quote in its listing of stocks on the various exchanges. This type of quote will most likely not indicate whether the stock pays a dividend - look for captions such as "Div" or "Yld". Even the Wall Street Journal, in its Monday-Friday editions, is now only providing price information. However, in its Saturday edition, the stock quotes carry a "YLD" caption. If a stock entry has a number in this column, it's paying a dividend and the number is the annualized percentage rate. (For related reading, see Reading Financial Tables.)

     

  • The weekly updates of the well-known Value Line Investment Survey have three tables that will interest dividend investors: "Highest Dividend Yielding Stocks", "Highest Dividend Yielding Non-Utility Stocks" and "Stocks With Highest Projected 3-5 Year Dividend Yield". Each of these tables lists about 100 stocks. They can be found at the back of Part 1, the "Summary & Index", and are a component of both the online and print editions. Most public libraries in the U.S. carry the Value Line Investment Survey, which is a paid subscription service, in their reference sections.

     

  • You can obtain, free of charge, a list of 800 dividend-paying stocks from Harry Domash's Dividend Detective, an online newsletter that has both free and paid subscription content.

     

  • If you're interested in professional investment guidance for dividend investing, these three monthly (paid subscription) newsletters are worth checking out through their websites:

     

To learn more about this topic, see Dividend Fact You May Not Know and The Power of Dividend Growth.

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