A:

There probably is no 100% correct answer here, but let's break it down.

Suppose that you are 23, you've been working for a couple of years and are now earning $50,000 per year. For 2008, you can contribute up to $5,000 to an IRA (Traditional, Roth or a combination of both). If you ask your CPA, he or she will most likely tell you to contribute to the Traditional IRA to receive the tax deduction, which will save you approximately $1,250 in federal tax due each tax year, assuming that you are in the 25% tax bracket and you qualify for the full deduction. Let's break down the deduction limits for Roth and Traditional IRAs.

Rules for 2008
If you are also covered by an employer-sponsored retirement plan and are:
-Making less than the $53,000 modified adjust gross income (MAGI) limit, you get the full deduction
-Making between $53,000 and $63,000 MAGI, you get a partial deduction
-Making more than $63,000 MAGI, your Traditional IRA contribution is not deductible

If you are not covered by an employer sponsored retirement plan, the full contribution will be deductible regardless of other factors.

If you make Traditional IRA contributions, you get the tax deduction now and tax-deferred growth on the earnings. When you retire, the full amount withdrawn is taxable as ordinary income.

For example, suppose that you contribute $5,000 per year to a Traditional IRA until you are 63 years old (40 years of saving $5,000 = $200,000) and your Traditional IRA grows to $2,212,962 by the time you hit age 63 (this is possible at a 10% return). Assuming that all your contributions were fully deductible, you saved $50,000 in taxes over the 40 years.
However, now that you are retired, you decide to withdraw $100,000 per year from your Traditional IRA. If you are still in a 25% tax bracket, you will pay $25,000 in income tax on each $100,000 withdrawal each year thereafter. As a result, you net out $75,000 in income per year. (To learn more, read Traditional IRA Deductibility Limits.)

The Roth works differently. Suppose you contribute the same $5,000 per year for 40 years to a Roth IRA. You get no immediate tax deduction, but the Roth IRA still grows to $2,212,962 (assuming a 10% annual return). At age 63, you withdraw $100,000 per year. The difference now is that there is no tax due on the Roth withdrawal, because Roth distributions made after retirement are tax free. In this scenario, you withdraw $100,000 and keep the full $100,000. In this case, the Roth IRA is clearly the best and wisest long-term investment decision for someone this age. (For more insight, see Tax Treatment Of Roth IRA Distributions.)

This questions was answered by Steven Merkel.

RELATED FAQS

  1. When can benefits be received from a provident fund?

    Find out when participants in provident funds can begin receiving benefits, including how funds can be used to finance important ...
  2. Is Social Security Income a perpetuity?

    Find out why Social Security income is not classified as a perpetuity, including what constitutes a perpetuity and the basics ...
  3. What types of investments are allowed in a provident fund?

    Read about the types of investments allowed in various provident funds around the world, including the Indian, Malaysian ...
  4. How does a provident fund compare to U.S. Social Security?

    Find out how provident funds compare to the U.S. Social Security program, including examples of income limits and contribution ...
RELATED TERMS
  1. See-Through Trust

    A trust that is treated as the beneficiary of an individual retirement ...
  2. Backdoor Roth IRA

    A method that taxpayers can use to place retirement savings in ...
  3. Current Service Benefit

    The amount of pension benefit accrued by an employee who had ...
  4. Self Invested Personal Pension (SIPP)

    A tax-efficient retirement savings account available in Great ...
  5. Elder Care

    Elder care, sometimes called elderly care, refers to services ...
  6. Gold IRA

    Definition of Gold IRA

You May Also Like

Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    Does it Make Sense to Have an MLP in ...

  2. Retirement

    Top Tips for Rebalancing 401(k) Assets

  3. Professionals

    Few Target-Date Managers Invest in Their ...

  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Should You Hire an Advisor or DIY Your ...

  5. Retirement

    Risky Business:Trading Inverse ETFs ...

Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!