A:

Financial portal websites, such as Yahoo Finance or Google Finance allows the average investor to view content related to a specific stock from a variety of different financial websites. The financial portals will give you access to all the rudimentary financial information that you need, such as summarized versions of the company's financial statements and gives you different slants regarding a stock's outlook. (For related reading, see Find Investment Quality In The Income Statement.)

Depending on whether you are using a full service brokerage or not, your brokerage can be another source of stock information. For example, many well known full-service brokerages, such as Merrill Lynch or Goldman Sachs offer clients proprietary research reports created by their own in-house analysts. These reports often contain detailed financial analysis on the company's present and future financial state, and perhaps a price target on where the company will be headed in the future. The benefit of these reports is that they are updated once a quarter or when a material event occurs. However, these reports do not represent guarantees and analysts can give incorrect outcomes. These brokerages charge higher commissions than discount brokerages.

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