A:

The best place to find a list of all thirty stocks included in the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) is the "Historical Components List" published on the official DJIA website. This fascinating list, which shows every change in the index since its creation in 1884, is updated every time as stock is added or deleted.

The DJIA, considered by many to be the gold standard of market indicators, is comprised of some of the largest and most well-known companies in the United States. Due to the diversity of stocks in the index, many economists consider the DJIA to be a strong indicator of the overall strength of the U.S. economy, not just the investments market.

Unlike the market-weighted S&P 500 index, probably the second-most watched indicator, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index. Thus, the DJIA is calculated theoretically by totaling the prices of one share of each component stock and dividing by thirty. However, the current divisor now equals a fraction of 1% due to years of adjustments for stock splits, mergers and the like. The price-weighted method arguably gives a more accurate representation of the movement of the overall market because it is not influenced by the number of shares each company has outstanding.

(For more on this topic, read Dow Jones Industrial Average History.)

This question was answered by Ken Clark.

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