The Pac-Man defense is a strategy in which a company that is facing a hostile takeover from another company essentially turns the tables and attempts to purchase the would-be buyer. The defensive strategy gets it name from the popular arcade video game of the 1980s - Pac-Man. In the game, Pac-Man's initial goal is to evade the enemies chasing him. However, when Pac-Man consumes the "power pill", he is able to turn around and eat the enemies that once had been in pursuit of him.

In business, if Company A shakes off an acquisition attempt by Company B, Company B is said to be executing a Pac-Man defense if it then turns the tables and attempts a takeover of Company A.

For more on this topic, read Corporate Takeover Defense: A Shareholder's Perspective.

This question was answered by Bob Schneider.

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