A:

Taxpayers use Form 1040X only when making a correction to a previous tax return. The taxpayer may have made an error or omitted information when he or she originally filed the return. The Form is not used to update personal information, such as a postal address or phone number.

Filing a 1040X does not mean that a taxpayer is in trouble. The form may be used to claim deductions or credits that were not claimed when a return was originally filed, and could result in less taxes being owed for the year.

When filing the 1040X, the IRS requires that you provide an explanation as to why the original filing is being adjusted. For example, the taxpayer may have received an additional W-2, or may need to change a filing status from single to married.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) allows taxpayers to file a Form 1040X if the taxpayer has already filed a Form 1040, 1040A, 1040EZ, 1040EZ-T, 1040NR or 1040NR-EZ. If corrections are being made to multiple tax forms filed over multiple years, a separate Form 1040X must be filed for each applicable year. The IRS estimates that the average taxpayer spends 9 hours filing a Form 1040X tax return.

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