No, a U.S. resident should not contribute to a RRSP account. RRSP contribution rules allow you to contribute a certain percentage of your earned income, but since your income is not from a Canadian source, you would not be eligible for any tax deductions in Canada.

However, even though you are not eligible to contribute to your RRSP, you are still allowed to keep your RRSP to let your investments grow without being subject to tax in Canada. As a U.S. resident, you can elect to defer income generated from your investments in your RRSP until it is withdrawn by filling out Form 8891 each year with your tax return.

In addition, if you are emigrating from Canada, you should maximize your contribution in the year that you leave Canada. The government gives you 60 days after year-end to make this contribution. Also, it is important to note that if you have taken any money out of your RRSP under the Home Buyer's Plan (HBP) or other plans, you should arrange to repay the amount before becoming a non-resident. Otherwise, that outstanding amount may be subject to income tax for the year of emigration. (To learn more about the retirement planning process, read Retirement Planning.)

If you do plan on staying in the U.S. for an extended period, you may want to look into opening an individual retirement account (IRA). You will be allowed to open an IRA in the U.S., as long as you are a legal U.S. resident with a valid social security number. This will allow you to defer taxes on contributions you make from income earned in the U.S. (For more information on choosing the right IRA, take a look at our article, Which Retirement Plan Is Best?)

  1. Can I borrow from my annuity to put a down payment on a house?

    You can borrow from your annuity to put a down payment on a house, but be prepared to pay an assortment of fees and penalties. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Who decides to print money in Canada?

    In Canada, new money comes from two places: the Bank of Canada (BOC) and chartered banks such as the Toronto Dominion Bank ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the main kinds of annuities?

    There are two broad categories of annuity: fixed and variable. These categories refer to the manner in which the investment ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the risks of rolling my 401(k) into an annuity?

    Though the appeal of having guaranteed income after retirement is undeniable, there are actually a number of risks to consider ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do I get out of my annuity and transfer to a new one?

    If you decide your current annuity is not for you, there is nothing stopping you from transferring your investment to a new ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Are Cafeteria plans exempt from Social Security?

    Typically, qualified benefits offered through cafeteria plans are exempt from Social Security taxes. However, certain types ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    What Does It Cost to Retire in Panama?

    Learn how much it costs to retire comfortably in Panama, and why it has become one of the most popular retirement destinations in the world.
  2. Investing

    Baby Boomer Philanthropy Shifts Wealth Adviser Focus

    Wealth advisers who integrate philanthropy and finance planning can stand out with baby boomer clients.
  3. Retirement

    The 5 Best Retirement Communities in Dallas, Texas

    Discover why the Dallas/Fort Worth area of Texas is a popular retirement destination, and five of the best retirement communities in the area.
  4. Professionals

    How to Protect Retirement and Help Adult Kids

    Parents can both protect their retirement money and help their adult kids. Here's how.
  5. Retirement

    10 Ways to Save Your Retirement: It's Not Too Late

    It's not too late to start saving for your retirement, even if you took longer to start thinking about it and doing something about it.
  6. Investing

    Why Is Financial Literacy and Education so Important?

    Financial literacy is the confluence of financial, credit and debt knowledge that is necessary to make the financial decisions that are integral to our everyday lives.
  7. Retirement

    5 Ways to Use Your Home to Retire

    Retirement is going to cost a lot, and for homeowners who face a shortfall, their home can be a source of income. From downsizing to renting, here's how.
  8. Investing

    10 Ways to Effectively Save for the Future

    Savings is as crucial as ever, as we deal with life changes and our needs for the future. Here are some essential steps to get started, now.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Mutual Funds Millennials Should Avoid

    Find out what kinds of mutual funds are unsuitable for millennial investors, especially when included in millennial retirement accounts.
  10. Retirement

    Retire on 70% of Your Income? Why It's Not Enough

    Many people think 70% will be enough to support them in retirement, but they forget a few significant expenses that could lurk in the future.
  1. Dynamic Updating

    A method of determining how much to withdraw from retirement ...
  2. Possibility Of Failure (POF) Rates

    The likelihood that a retiree will run out of money prematurely ...
  3. Safe Withdrawal Rate (SWR) Method

    A method to determine how much retirees can withdraw from their ...
  4. Qualified Longevity Annuity Contract

    A Qualified Longevity Annuity Contract (QLAC) is a deferred annuity ...
  5. Mandatory Distribution

    The amount an individual must withdraw from certain types of ...
  6. Auto Enrollment Plan

    An employer’s decision to sign employees up to have a percentage ...

You May Also Like

Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!