How do investors "chase the market"? It this a bad thing?

By Bob Schneider AAA
A:

Generally

, an investor "chases the market" when he or she enters into a highly priced position after the stock price has increased rapidly or become overpriced. An investor who exits a position after the security has lost considerable value also is said to be chasing the market. Both positions suggest that the investor chased the market by following trends unwisely. Many investors unknowingly chase the market and endure large losses as a result.

During the dotcom bubble, for example, many investors sought to profit from buying shares of internet and technology companies that were doing well. The popularity of dotcom companies eventually dropped and the investors who had chased the market were left with big losses.

Investors who chase the market typically make investment choices based on emotion rather than careful consideration of market trends using statistics and financial data. For this reason, this strategy has been widely criticized and most financial advisors warn against it

For more on this topic, read When Fear and Greed Take Over and The Madness of Crowds.

This question was answered by Bob Schneider.

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