Does the balance sheet always balance?

By Joseph Nguyen AAA
A:

Yes, a balance sheet should always balance. The name "balance sheet" is based on the fact that assets will equal liabilities and equity every time.

The assets on the balance sheet consist of things of value that the company owns or will receive in the future and which are measurable. Liabilities are what the company owes, such as taxes, payables, salaries and debt. The equity sections displays the company's retained earnings and the capital that has been contributed by shareholders.

The balance between assets, liability and equity makes sense when applied to a simpler example, such as buying a car for $10,000. In this case, you might use a $5,000 loan (debt), and $5,000 cash (equity) to purchase it. Your assets are worth $10,000 total, while your debt is $5,000 and equity is $5,000. In this simple example, assets equal debt plus equity.

The major reason that a balance sheet balances is the accounting principle of double entry. This accounting system records all transactions in at least two different accounts, and therefore also acts as a check to make sure the entries are consistent. Building on the previous example, suppose you decided to sell your car for $10,000. In this case, your asset account will decrease by $10,000 while your cash account, or account receivable, will increase by $10,000 so that everything continues to balance. (This is a very simple example. If you wish to learn more, check out Reading The Balance Sheet and Breaking Down The Balance Sheet.)

If the balance sheet you're working on does not balance, this should be a red flag that there is likely a problem with one or more entries. Even a small discrepancy can occur as a result of several errors that offset each other.

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