A:

a. the date a security's registration is approved - lasting for one year.

b. the date the first transaction of an approved security takes place.

c. the date an issuer and underwriter agree to bring a security to market.

d. the date a security is due for re-registration, one year after the initial registration.


Answer: A

The effective date is defined as the actual date a security is granted approval, lasting for one year after such.

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