A:

A force majeure is derived from the French term meaning "greater force" and refers to any natural and unavoidable catastrophe. A force majeure clause is included in contracts to remove liability when such events restrict participants from fulfilling their obligations. When negotiating these clauses, make sure that they apply equally and benefit all parties bound to the agreement. It may also be helpful to include some specific examples of acts that will be covered under the clause such as wars, natural disasters, and other major events that are clearly outside a party's control. Examples will help to clarify that the clause is not intended to apply to excuse failures to perform for reasons within the control of the parties.



(For more on this read, Preparing for Nature's Worst)



This question was answered by Katie Adams.



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