A:

One of the great attractions for many that become stockbrokers, is that there is no such thing as a typical day. In fact, being a stockbroker is essentially the same as being a small business owner. You decide when, how and who you work with.

While that sounds like a wonderful life of leisure, it usually takes successful brokers five to 10 years to get to that level. The first few years can be especially grueling. During this time, the vast majority of a stockbroker's energy is put into finding new clients with assets to invest. Since the average stockbroker generates approximately 1% revenue on their assets under management, and they only get to keep 30-40% of that revenue, a new broker would typically need to find $10,000,000 in new client assets to make $30,000-40,000 in their first year.

While some stockbrokers get lucky or have great connections, the vast majority of new brokers do initially keep a daily schedule that is built heavily around marketing themselves. This means showing up at the office an hour or two before the stock market opens for trading, so that they can get all their research done early in the day. The first few hours of trading are spent contacting their existing clients with recommendations for their portfolio. Following a short lunch, the broker may meet with a few clients or prospects face-to-face as well as wrap up the day's paperwork. Then, most new brokers usually end their day by spending two to four early evening hours making cold calls, networking or teaching seminars to prospective clients. It's not uncommon for new brokers to spend four to six hours on Saturdays, doing some kind of marketing as well.

For more on this read, Financial Careers According to Hollywood.

This question was answered by Ken Clark.

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