When am I considered "married" for tax purposes?

By Denise Appleby AAA
A:

You are generally considered married for tax purposes as long as you were married as of the last day of the year, regardless of whether your marriage license has been issued. Your last name is a non-issue, as many married couples file jointly even when they have different last names.

The decision about whether to file joint or separate returns depends on which would be better for you from a financial perspective. The best way to make this determination is to have your tax preparer prepare a draft of both types of returns (single and married-filing-jointly) so that you can determine which produces the better results for you and your spouse.

For more insight, see Happily Married? File Separately! and The Tax Benefits Of Having A Spouse.

This question was answered by Denise Appleby.

RELATED FAQS

  1. What is Value-Added Tax (VAT) and who pays it?

    Learn about the definition of value-added tax, the necessary circumstances that require a business to pay it and when a business ...
  2. What is the difference between gross income and earned income?

    Being able to distinguish between earned income and gross income is an important tool in preparing for and filing your individual ...
  3. What are the differences among gross income, adjusted gross income and modified adjusted ...

    Discover how calculating total taxable income is easier when gross income, adjusted gross income and modified adjusted gross ...
  4. What is the difference between gross income and taxable income?

    Understanding common tax terms including gross income and taxable income can help individuals navigate tax accounting in ...
RELATED TERMS
  1. Deferred Tax Asset

    A deferred tax asset is an asset on a company's balance sheet ...
  2. Special Power Of Attorney

    A special power of attorney grants an agent the authority to ...
  3. Financial Power Of Attorney

    A financial power of attorney grants a trusted agent the authority ...
  4. Buffett Rule

    A tax rule proposed in 2011, by President Barack Obama, stating ...
  5. Benefits Received Rule

    1. A theory of income tax fairness that says people should pay ...
  6. Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax - GSTT

    A tax incurred when there is a transfer of property by gift or ...

You May Also Like

Related Articles
  1. Taxes

    How To Deduct All Of Your Charitable ...

  2. Personal Finance

    5 Developed Countries That Welcome Expats

  3. Personal Finance

    5 Countries Where It's Hardest To Become ...

  4. Personal Finance

    How To Become A U.S. Citizen

  5. Credit & Loans

    7 Times It Costs More To Pay With A ...

Trading Center