A:

The Mont Pelerin Society was formed in 1947 when economist Friedrich von Hayek invited 39 people to meet at Mont Pelerin in Switzerland. Mostly made up of economists, the group was brought together to discuss the state of classical Liberalism. The society wasn't formed to put forth a particular political agenda, but all of the members shared core values about the liberty of the individual and the benefits of an open society. Being economists, the topics often spilled over to studying the strengths and weaknesses of free market economics and finding free market solutions to problems.

In the first years of the society, the members focused on the problems inherent in communism and collectivism. Many members of the society were brought into government think tanks and were instrumental in forming the economic policy.

Still very much active, the Mont Pelerin Society boasts a membership featuring Nobel Memorial Prize winners, high ranking government officials, journalists, financial experts and many others from all over the world. It meets on an annual basis for a general meeting held in a different country every year. (To learn more, see our Economics Basics Tutorial.)

This question was answered by Andrew Beattie

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