A:

A. maintain a proportionate share of ownership.

B. decline to exchange convertible debentures.

C. vote against issuance of securities that take precedence.

D.prevent dividend payments on other securities until the common-stock dividend is distributed.


Answer: A

Because all other securities take precedence over common shares, the other answers are false.

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