A:

The irrevocable life insurance trust or "ILIT" is a trust that cannot be rescinded, amended or modified in any way after its creation. Once the grantor contributes property or life insurance death benefits to the trust, he or she cannot change the terms of the trust or reclaim any property left to the trust.

There are three good reasons to utilize an ILIT. The first is for estate tax considerations, the second is for concern of leaving a large sum of money unsupervised to a minor or an irresponsible adult, and lastly for asset protection concerns.

If an ILIT is properly structured, the death benefits paid to the trust will be free from inclusion in the gross estate of the insured. This is different from when life insurance death benefits are paid to an individual, as the proceeds are included in the taxable estate of the decedent.

If the insured has beneficiaries that are minors or adults (maybe those that have had issues in the past, such as alcohol or drug abuse, problems handling their finances, etc.), it might be a good idea to set up an ILIT with the trust as beneficiary. This appoints a trustee to act as a supervisor for the trust and distribute the assets per the terms of the trust documents as per the grantor's wishes.

The ILIT will also provide a level of asset protection for the beneficiaries should they possibly be in current litigation or experience the potential of a future lawsuit against them. ILITs are not considered to be owned by the beneficiaries, which in turn makes them extremely difficult for courts to attach as assets of the beneficiary, thus making them next to impossible for creditors to access.

Learn how to read one of the most important documents you own, Understand Your Insurance Contract.

This question was answered by Steven Merkel.

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