A:

Normal information, such as a paid or unpaid notation, usually hits a credit report within 30 days of the close of the billing cycle for that account. According to Experian, creditors usually report credit information to the bureau once a month. If a payment is recorded close to the time the creditor reports, then that payment shows up quickly. If a payment is recorded directly after the creditor reports, that payment shows up nearly a month later. Inquiries for a credit report are reported right away, so if you go on an application spree, the 12th lender sees all previous 11 inquiries.

There are no laws mandating creditors to report credit information, so some good or neutral information is never reported. Creditors, such as cellular service providers and landlords, rarely report positive information at all, choosing only to report negative information. However, there are a few rules regarding the reporting of negative information. For example, a late payment cannot be reported on a credit report unless it is at least 31 days late. After that time, it usually shows up on the credit report within the usual 30 days.

Creditors usually do not charge off a debt and turn it over to a collection agency until 180 continuous days of non-payment have passed, so you may have at least six months before a collection or charge off shows up on your credit report. However, each month the creditor can mark the debt as late, from 30 days to 60 days to 90 days to 180 days, further hurting your credit score.

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