A:

The .PK is an example of a suffix representing where the security is traded - an over-the-counter (OTC) network or an international exchange. The major U.S. exchanges such as the NYSE, Nasdaq and AMEX do not have suffixes. The .PK behind a stock simply means the stock in question is traded on the pink sheets (or the Pink Sheets Electronic Quotation service).

OTC Markets
The pink sheets service is a loosely regulated over-the-counter, decentralized market. There are few requirements to being listed on this network, as companies do not have to file with the SEC nor keep updated financial information. The only major requirement to being listed is to have at least one market maker, who must be registered with the SEC and a member of the NASD. The market maker is responsible for quoting the latest trading price of the stock on the pink sheets network. This is a highly speculative and risky place to invest. Investores would be wise to only invest what they are willing to lose.

The other suffix for an over-the-counter market is .OB. It means securities are traded on the OTCBB. This network is also one of high risk but is less risky than the pink sheets, as it is a regulated and has stricter listing requirements.

International Exchanges
Suffixes appended to the end of a stock symbol most often represent exchanges outside of the United States. For example, Canada's Toronto Stock Exchange is represented by a .TO, so if you see a stock symbol with a .TO suffix you'll know it trades on the TSX. All major foreign exchanges have a suffix designated to them.

Here is a list of a few international exchanges:

exchange.gif

A more complete list can be found here.

For further reading, see Getting To Know Stock Exchanges and our Stock Basics tutorial.

RELATED FAQS
  1. Why do some stock symbols have three letters while others have four? What is the ...

    Stocks found on the New York and American Stock Exchange will normally have symbols with three letters or fewer. On the other ... Read Answer >>
  2. How does a company move from an OTC market to a major exchange?

    The over-the-counter market is not an actual exchange like the NYSE or Nasdaq. Instead, it is a network of companies that ... Read Answer >>
  3. I own shares of a company that just received a delisting notice from Nasdaq. Does ...

    Let's start by walking through the reasons for listing requirements and what happens when a company's stock is delisted from ... Read Answer >>
  4. Are over-the-counter stocks different from other stocks?

    Explore the difference between stocks traded over-the-counter and those listed on the NYSE or Nasdaq. Learn how price affects ... Read Answer >>
  5. What are the risks involved in OTC (over-the-counter) trading?

    Learn about the significant disadvantages and risks that are involved for investors seeking to trade in over-the-counter ... Read Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Insights

    What are the Pink Sheets?

    Pink Sheets is a listing of over-the-counter stocks that are not listed on any established exchange such as the New York Stock Exchange or the NASDAQ.
  2. Trading

    Use Caution Trading Pink Sheet Stocks

    Pink Sheets stocks offer exciting opportunities to increase portfolio returns by large magnitudes in a short time. However, these opportunities come with significant risks. Investors need to ...
  3. Investing

    A Look At Primary And Secondary Markets

    Knowing how the primary and secondary markets work is key to understanding how stocks trade.
  4. Insights

    Getting To Know The Stock Exchanges

    Here are the answers to all the questions you have about stock exchanges but are too afraid to ask!
  5. Investing

    What's an Over-The-Counter Market?

    The over-the-counter market is a decentralized market in which unlisted securities trade.
  6. Investing

    The Lowdown On Penny Stocks

    Think penny stocks will make you rich? If you don't understand the risks, you could end up penniless.
  7. Investing

    How To Identify A Micro-Cap Scam

    Discover how to distinguish a real investment opportunity from a fraudulent one.
  8. Investing

    Translating Ticker Talk

    Stock tickers can say a lot about a company in just a few letters. Find out how to read them.
  9. Investing

    Understanding Penny Stocks' Risks and Rewards

    Penny stocks can soar in a short period, but dabbling in them is a dangerous game. Here is a breakdown on the risks and rewards of penny stocks.
  10. Investing

    Stock Exchanges Around The World

    We tell you about five of the most popular stock exchanges from around the globe.
RELATED TERMS
  1. Pink Sheets

    A daily publication compiled by the National Quotation Bureau ...
  2. E

    A temporary fifth character suffix to a symbol for a stock traded ...
  3. Yellow Sheets

    A United States bulletin that provides updated bid and ask prices ...
  4. Stock Market

    The market in which shares of publicly held companies are issued ...
  5. Over-The-Counter Market

    A decentralized market, without a central physical location, ...
  6. Pink Slip Party

    A party that brings together professionals and recruiters who ...
Hot Definitions
  1. Restricted Stock Unit

    Compensation offered by an employer to an employee in the form of company stock. The employee does not receive the stock ...
  2. Operating Ratio

    A ratio that shows the efficiency of a company's management by comparing operating expense to net sales. Calculated as:
  3. Expense Ratio

    A measure of what it costs an investment company to operate a mutual fund. An expense ratio is determined through an annual ...
  4. Pro Forma

    A Latin term meaning "for the sake of form". In the investing world, it describes a method of calculating financial results ...
  5. Trumpcare

    The American Health Care Act, also known as Trumpcare and Ryancare, is the Republican proposal to replace Obamacare.
  6. Free Carrier - FCA

    A trade term requiring the seller to deliver goods to a named airport, terminal, or other place where the carrier operates. ...
Trading Center