A:

One of the most compelling reasons for you to invest is the prospect of not having to work your entire life! Bottom line, there are only two ways to make money: by working and/or by having your assets work for you.

If you keep your money in your back pocket instead of investing it, your money doesn't work for you and you will never have more money than what you save. By investing your money, you are getting your money to generate more money by earning interest on what you put away or by buying and selling assets that increase in value.

It really doesn't matter how you do it. Whether you invest in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, options and futures, precious metals, real estate, your own small business, or any combination thereof, the objective is the same: to make investments that will generate more cash for you in the future. As they say, "Money isn't everything, but happiness alone can't keep out the rain."

Whether your goal is to send your kids to college or to retire on a yacht in the Mediterranean, investing is essential to getting you where you want to be.

Here are some articles that will help you on your way: Basic Investment Objectives, Ten Tips For The Successful Long-Term Investor and Ten Books Every Investor Should Read.

RELATED FAQS
  1. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What does a futures contract cost?

    The value of a futures contract is derived from the cash value of the underlying asset. While a futures contract may have ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the main risks associated with trading derivatives?

    The primary risks associated with trading derivatives are market, counterparty, liquidity and interconnection risks. Derivatives ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can an investor profit from a fall in the utilities sector?

    The utilities sector exhibits a high degree of stability compared to the broader market. This makes it best-suited for buy-and-hold ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Home & Auto

    Understanding Rent-to-Own Contracts

    They can work for you or against you. Here's how to negotiate a fair one.
  2. Home & Auto

    Avoiding the 5 Most Common Rent-to-Own Mistakes

    Pitfalls that a prospective tenant-buyer could encounter on the road to purchase – and how not to stumble into them.
  3. Home & Auto

    Renting vs. Owning: Which is Better for You?

    Despite the conventional wisdom, renting might make more financial sense than you think.
  4. Investing Basics

    Understanding the Spot Market

    A spot market is a market where a commodity or security is bought or sold and then delivered immediately.
  5. Investing Basics

    Explaining Options Contracts

    Options contracts grant the owner the right to buy or sell shares of a security in the future at a given price.
  6. Home & Auto

    When Are Rent-to-Own Homes a Good Idea?

    Lease now and pay later can work – for a select few.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: PowerShares S&P 500 Downside Hedged

    Find out about the PowerShares S&P 500 Downside Hedged ETF, and learn detailed information about characteristics, suitability and recommendations of it.
  8. Home & Auto

    When Getting a Rent-to-Own Car Makes Sense

    If your credit is bad, rent-to-own may be a better way to purchase a car than taking out a subprime loan – or it may not be. Get out your calculator.
  9. Investing Basics

    Explaining Forward Rate Agreements

    Forward rate agreement (FRA) refers to an interest rate or foreign exchange hedging strategy.
  10. Options & Futures

    An Introduction To Value at Risk (VAR)

    Volatility is not the only way to measure risk. Learn about the "new science of risk management".
RELATED TERMS
  1. Theta

    A measure of the rate of decline in the value of an option due ...
  2. Derivative

    A security with a price that is dependent upon or derived from ...
  3. Security

    A financial instrument that represents an ownership position ...
  4. Series 6

    A securities license entitling the holder to register as a limited ...
  5. Internal Rate Of Return - IRR

    A metric used in capital budgeting measuring the profitability ...
  6. Board Of Directors - B Of D

    A group of individuals that are elected as, or elected to act ...

You May Also Like

Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!