Futures (Commodities & Derivatives) Terms

  1. Long Hedge

  2. Long Jelly Roll

  3. Long Straddle

  4. Long The Basis

  5. Look-Alike Contracts

  6. Low Exercise Price Option - LEPO

  7. Macro-Hedge

  8. Managed Futures

  9. Managed Futures Account

  10. Margin

  11. Mark To Market - MTM

  12. Mark To Model

  13. Market Index Target-Term Security - MITTS

  14. Market Is Up

  15. Market Proxy

  16. Market Technicians Association - MTA

  17. Master Swap Agreement

  18. Miami Stock Exchange

  19. Micro-Hedge

  20. Mini-Sized Dow Options

  21. Minimum Price Contract

  22. Mismatch Risk

  23. Model Risk

  24. Modified Following

  25. Montreal Exchange

  26. Mortgage Pipeline

  27. Mr. Copper

  28. MSCI All Country World Commodity Producers Sector Capped Index (MSCI AWC)

  29. Multiple Linear Regression - MLR

  30. Mumbai Interbank Forward Offer Rate - MIFOR

  31. Municipals-Over-Bonds Spread - MOB

  32. Must Be Filled - MBF

  33. Mutualization Of Risk

  34. Narrow Basis

  35. National Commodities And Derivatives Exchange - NCDEX

  36. National Futures Association - NFA

  37. Natural Capital

  38. Natural Gas ETF

  39. Nearby Month

  40. Negative Carry

  41. Netback

  42. New York Board Of Trade - NYBOT

  43. New York Futures Exchange - NYFE

  44. New York Mercantile Exchange - NYMEX

  45. NFA Compliance Rule 2-43b

  46. Nick Leeson

  47. No Dealing Desk

  48. Nominal Quotation

  49. Non-Deliverable Forward - NDF

  50. Non-Member Trader

  51. Noncommercial Trader

  52. Nonfinancial Asset

  53. Noon Average Rate Contract - NARC

  54. North Sea Brent Crude

  55. Note Against Bond Spread - NOB

  56. Notional Value

  57. Offset

  58. Oil ETF

  59. Omnibus Account

  60. On Track

  61. Online Trading

  62. OPEC Basket

  63. Open Interest

  64. Open Outcry

  65. Operational Efficiency

  66. Options Clearing Corporation - OCC

  67. Options On Futures

  68. Outright Futures Position

  69. Over-Hedging

  70. Overnight Index Swap

  71. Palladium

  72. Participatory Notes

  73. Pay/Collect

  74. Physical Delivery

  75. Physical Option

  76. Pin Risk

  77. Pit

  78. Plain Vanilla

  79. Platinum

  80. Point Balance

  81. Points

  82. Political Futures

  83. Pork Bellies

  84. Portfolio Insurance

  85. Portfolio Margin

  86. Position Limit

  87. Position Trader

  88. Positive Carry

  89. Posted Price

  90. Pre-Arranged Trading

  91. Precious Metals

  92. Prediction Market

  93. Predictive Market

  94. Previous Close

  95. Price Basing

  96. Price Channel

  97. Price Discovery

  98. Price Swap Derivative

  99. Primary Instrument

  100. Privilege Dealer

Hot Definitions
  1. Odious Debt

    Money borrowed by one country from another country and then misappropriated by national rulers. A nation's debt becomes odious debt when government leaders use borrowed funds in ways that don't benefit or even oppress citizens. Some legal scholars argue that successor governments should not be held accountable for odious debt incurred by earlier regimes, but there is no consensus on how odious debt should actually be treated.
  2. Takeover

    A corporate action where an acquiring company makes a bid for an acquiree. If the target company is publicly traded, the acquiring company will make an offer for the outstanding shares.
  3. Harvest Strategy

    A strategy in which investment in a particular line of business is reduced or eliminated because the revenue brought in by additional investment would not warrant the expense. A harvest strategy is employed when a line of business is considered to be a cash cow, meaning that the brand is mature and is unlikely to grow if more investment is added.
  4. Stop-Limit Order

    An order placed with a broker that combines the features of stop order with those of a limit order. A stop-limit order will be executed at a specified price (or better) after a given stop price has been reached. Once the stop price is reached, the stop-limit order becomes a limit order to buy (or sell) at the limit price or better.
  5. Pareto Principle

    A principle, named after economist Vilfredo Pareto, that specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The principle states that, for many phenomena, 20% of invested input is responsible for 80% of the results obtained. Put another way, 80% of consequences stem from 20% of the causes.
  6. Pareto Principle

    A principle, named after economist Vilfredo Pareto, that specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The principle states that, for many phenomena, 20% of invested input is responsible for 80% of the results obtained. Put another way, 80% of consequences stem from 20% of the causes.
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