Mutual Funds Investment Terms

  1. Product Portfolio

  2. Prospect Theory

  3. Prospectus

  4. Protected Fund

  5. Proxy Vote

  6. Quant Fund

  7. Ralph Wanger

  8. Ramani Ayer

  9. Real Estate Investment Group

  10. Reclassification

  11. Redemption

  12. Redemption Fee

  13. Redemption Mechanism

  14. Regional Fund

  15. Registered Representative - RR

  16. Registered Retirement Savings Plan - RRSP

  17. Regulated Investment Company - RIC

  18. Regulation EE

  19. Regulation M

  20. Regulation R

  21. Regulation U

  22. Reinvestment

  23. Relative Return

  24. Relative Strength

  25. Research Report

  26. Retail Fund

  27. Retirement Income Fund - RIF

  28. Rights of Accumulation - ROA

  29. Risk Measures

  30. Risk Parity

  31. Risk-Adjusted Return

  32. Russell 1000 Index

  33. S&P Phenomenon

  34. Safe Asset

  35. Sales Charge

  36. Savings Rate

  37. SEC Form 15-12G

  38. SEC Form 24F-2NT

  39. SEC Form 497K1

  40. SEC Form N-14AE

  41. SEC Form N-1A

  42. SEC Form N-30B-2

  43. SEC POS AM Filing

  44. Sector Breakdown

  45. Sector ETF

  46. Sector Fund

  47. Sector Rotation

  48. Security Market Indicator Series - SMIS

  49. Segregated Fund

  50. Self-Directed IRA - SDIRA

  51. Sell Side

  52. Separate Account

  53. Series 23

  54. Series 52

  55. Series 6

  56. Series 62

  57. Series 82

  58. Service Shares

  59. Seven Day Yield

  60. Share Class

  61. Shareholder Services Agent

  62. Shares

  63. Shariah-Compliant Funds

  64. Sharpe Ratio

  65. Short Form Prospectus Distribution System - SFPDS

  66. Short-Term Investment Fund - STIF

  67. Silver ETF

  68. Single-Country Fund

  69. Sir John Templeton

  70. Small Cap

  71. Société d'Investissement À Capital Variable - SICAV

  72. Socially Responsible Investment - SRI

  73. Soft Dollars

  74. Specific Share Identification

  75. Specific-Shares Method

  76. Spiders - SPDR

  77. Sponsor

  78. Spread-Load Contractual Plan

  79. Statement of Additional Information - SAI

  80. Statement Shock

  81. Statement Stuffer

  82. Statutory Reserves

  83. Sterling Ratio

  84. Stewardship Grade

  85. Stock Trader

  86. Streetable

  87. Structured Funds

  88. Style

  89. Style Box

  90. Style Drift

  91. Sub-Advised Fund

  92. Sub-Asset Class

  93. Super NOW Account

  94. Survivorship Bias

  95. Survivorship Bias Risk

  96. Switching

  97. Systematic Investment Plan - SIP

  98. Systematic Withdrawal Plan - SWP

  99. Tactical Asset Allocation - TAA

  100. Target Risk Fund

Hot Definitions
  1. Odious Debt

    Money borrowed by one country from another country and then misappropriated by national rulers. A nation's debt becomes odious debt when government leaders use borrowed funds in ways that don't benefit or even oppress citizens. Some legal scholars argue that successor governments should not be held accountable for odious debt incurred by earlier regimes, but there is no consensus on how odious debt should actually be treated.
  2. Takeover

    A corporate action where an acquiring company makes a bid for an acquiree. If the target company is publicly traded, the acquiring company will make an offer for the outstanding shares.
  3. Harvest Strategy

    A strategy in which investment in a particular line of business is reduced or eliminated because the revenue brought in by additional investment would not warrant the expense. A harvest strategy is employed when a line of business is considered to be a cash cow, meaning that the brand is mature and is unlikely to grow if more investment is added.
  4. Stop-Limit Order

    An order placed with a broker that combines the features of stop order with those of a limit order. A stop-limit order will be executed at a specified price (or better) after a given stop price has been reached. Once the stop price is reached, the stop-limit order becomes a limit order to buy (or sell) at the limit price or better.
  5. Pareto Principle

    A principle, named after economist Vilfredo Pareto, that specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The principle states that, for many phenomena, 20% of invested input is responsible for 80% of the results obtained. Put another way, 80% of consequences stem from 20% of the causes.
  6. Pareto Principle

    A principle, named after economist Vilfredo Pareto, that specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The principle states that, for many phenomena, 20% of invested input is responsible for 80% of the results obtained. Put another way, 80% of consequences stem from 20% of the causes.
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