Options Terms

  1. Speculative Bubble

  2. Speculator

  3. Speed

  4. Spice Trader

  5. Split Adjusted

  6. Split Block Pricing

  7. Split Close

  8. Spoo

  9. Spot Commodity

  10. Spot Delivery Month

  11. Spot Market

  12. Spot Premium

  13. Spot Price

  14. Spot Trade

  15. Spread

  16. Spread Option

  17. Spreadlock

  18. Spring Loading

  19. Stability And Growth Pact - SGP

  20. Static Spread

  21. Statutory Stock Option

  22. Step Premium

  23. STIR Futures & Options

  24. Stochastic Volatility - SV

  25. Stock Appreciation Right - SAR

  26. Stock Compensation

  27. Stock Option

  28. Stock Replacement Strategy

  29. Stock Swap

  30. Stock-For-Stock

  31. Stockholm Stock Exchange (STO) .ST

  32. STOXX

  33. Straddle

  34. Strangle

  35. Strap

  36. Street Book

  37. Strike Price

  38. Strip

  39. Strong Hands

  40. Structural Change

  41. Structured Funds

  42. Structured Note

  43. Sugar No.11

  44. Suitable (Suitability)

  45. Super Hedging

  46. Swap

  47. Swap Bank

  48. Swap Curve

  49. Swap Rate

  50. Swap Spread

  51. Swap Transferring Risk With Participating Element - STRIPE

  52. Swaption (Swap Option)

  53. Sweet Crude

  54. Swing Option

  55. Switch

  56. Switching

  57. Synthetic

  58. Synthetic Call

  59. Synthetic CDO

  60. Synthetic Dividend

  61. Synthetic Forward Contract

  62. Synthetic Futures Contract

  63. Synthetic Put

  64. T. Boone Pickens

  65. TAPO

  66. Taxable Event

  67. Ted Spread

  68. Temporary Lender

  69. Termination Date

  70. Tertiary Recovery

  71. Theta

  72. Tick Size

  73. Ticker Symbol

  74. Time Decay

  75. Time In Force

  76. Time Value

  77. Time-Varying Volatility

  78. Topside

  79. Total Return Swap

  80. Toxic Assets

  81. Trade Date

  82. Trade Or Fade Rule

  83. Trade Signal

  84. Trading Desk

  85. Trading Halt

  86. Transaction

  87. Translation Risk

  88. Treasury Index

  89. Treasury Lock

  90. Treasury Stock Method

  91. Trillion Cubic Feet - Tcf

  92. Trinomial Option Pricing Model

  93. Triple Witching

  94. Troy Ounce

  95. Trust-Owned Life Insurance - TOLI

  96. Tuition Insurance

  97. Tweezer

  98. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - HUD

  99. U.S. Dollar Index - USDX

  100. Ultima

Hot Definitions
  1. Takeover

    A corporate action where an acquiring company makes a bid for an acquiree. If the target company is publicly traded, the acquiring company will make an offer for the outstanding shares.
  2. Harvest Strategy

    A strategy in which investment in a particular line of business is reduced or eliminated because the revenue brought in by additional investment would not warrant the expense. A harvest strategy is employed when a line of business is considered to be a cash cow, meaning that the brand is mature and is unlikely to grow if more investment is added.
  3. Stop-Limit Order

    An order placed with a broker that combines the features of stop order with those of a limit order. A stop-limit order will be executed at a specified price (or better) after a given stop price has been reached. Once the stop price is reached, the stop-limit order becomes a limit order to buy (or sell) at the limit price or better.
  4. Pareto Principle

    A principle, named after economist Vilfredo Pareto, that specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The principle states that, for many phenomena, 20% of invested input is responsible for 80% of the results obtained. Put another way, 80% of consequences stem from 20% of the causes.
  5. Pareto Principle

    A principle, named after economist Vilfredo Pareto, that specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The principle states that, for many phenomena, 20% of invested input is responsible for 80% of the results obtained. Put another way, 80% of consequences stem from 20% of the causes.
  6. Budget Deficit

    A status of financial health in which expenditures exceed revenue. The term "budget deficit" is most commonly used to refer to government spending rather than business or individual spending. When referring to accrued federal government deficits, the term "national debt” is used.
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