Options Terms

  1. Cash Price

  2. Cash Settlement

  3. Cash Trigger

  4. Cash Wages

  5. Cash-And-Carry Trade

  6. Cash-And-Carry-Arbitrage

  7. Cash-Based Option

  8. Cash-Or-Nothing Call

  9. Cash-or-Nothing Put

  10. Cash-Settled Options

  11. Cashless Conversion

  12. Cashless Exercise

  13. Cat Spread

  14. Catastrophe Futures

  15. Catastrophe Swap

  16. Certificated Stock

  17. CFLEX

  18. Chameleon Option

  19. Change

  20. Changer

  21. Charm

  22. Cheap Stock

  23. Cheapest to Deliver - CTD

  24. Chicago Board Of Trade - CBOT

  25. Chicago Board Options Exchange - CBOE

  26. Chicago Mercantile Exchange - CME

  27. China Securities Regulatory Commission - CSRC

  28. Chinese Hedge

  29. Chooser Option

  30. Christmas Tree

  31. Circus Swap

  32. Clearing

  33. Clearing Fee

  34. Clearing House

  35. Clearing Member Trade Agreement - CMTA

  36. Cliquet

  37. Closing Range

  38. Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange - CSCE

  39. Collar

  40. Collar Agreement

  41. Color

  42. Combination

  43. Combination Loan

  44. COMEX

  45. Commercial

  46. Commercial Grain Stock

  47. Commercial Hedger

  48. Commercial Trader

  49. Commission House

  50. Commitments of Traders Report - COT

  51. Commodities Exchange

  52. Commoditization

  53. Commodity

  54. Commodity ETF

  55. Commodity Exchange Act - CEA

  56. Commodity Futures Contract

  57. Commodity Futures Modernization Act - CFMA

  58. Commodity Futures Trading Commission - CFTC

  59. Commodity Index

  60. Commodity Market

  61. Commodity Paper

  62. Commodity Pool

  63. Commodity Pool Operator - CPO

  64. Commodity Price Risk

  65. Commodity Research Bureau Index - CRB

  66. Commodity Selection Index - CSI

  67. Commodity Swap

  68. Commodity Trading Advisor - CTA

  69. Commodity-Product Spread

  70. Competitive Bid Option

  71. Compliance Registered Options Principal - CROP

  72. Compound Option

  73. Conditional Call Option

  74. Condor Spread

  75. Confusion Of Goods

  76. Constant Maturity Swap - CMS

  77. Constructive Sale Rule - Section 1259

  78. Contango

  79. Contingency Order

  80. Contingent Order

  81. Contract For Differences - CFD

  82. Contract Market

  83. Contract Month

  84. Contract Size

  85. Contract Unit

  86. Convenience Yield

  87. Convergence

  88. Conversion

  89. Conversion Arbitrage

  90. Cooling Degree Day - CDD

  91. Copenhagen Stock Exchange - CSE

  92. Copper

  93. Corn/Hog Ratio

  94. Corner

  95. Cost Basis

  96. Cost Of Tender

  97. Counterbid

  98. Counterparty

  99. Country Basket

  100. Cover

Hot Definitions
  1. Leased Bank Guarantee

    A bank guarantee that is leased to a third party for a specific fee. The issuing bank will conduct due diligence on the creditworthiness of the customer looking to secure a bank guarantee, then lease a guarantee to that customer for a set amount of money and over a set period of time, typically less than two years.
  2. Degree Of Financial Leverage - DFL

    A ratio that measures the sensitivity of a company’s earnings per share (EPS) to fluctuations in its operating income, as a result of changes in its capital structure. Degree of Financial Leverage (DFL) measures the percentage change in EPS for a unit change in earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT).
  3. Jeff Bezos

    Self-made billionaire Jeff Bezos is famous for founding online retail giant Amazon.com.
  4. Re-fracking

    Re-fracking is the practice of returning to older wells that had been fracked in the recent past to capitalize on newer, more effective extraction technology. Re-fracking can be effective on especially tight oil deposits – where the shale products low yields – to extend their productivity.
  5. TIMP (acronym)

    'TIMP' is an acronym that stands for 'Turkey, Indonesia, Mexico and Philippines.' Similar to BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China), the acronym was coined by and investor/economist to group fast-growing emerging market economies in similar states of economic development.
  6. Pension Risk Transfer

    When a defined benefit pension provider offloads some or all of the plan’s risk – e.g.: retirement payment liabilities to former employee beneficiaries. The plan sponsor can do this by offering vested plan participants a lump-sum payment to voluntarily leave the plan, or by negotiating with an insurance company to take on the responsibility for paying benefits.
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