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  1. Investing Basics

    Understanding Total Return Swaps

    A total return swap is a contract in which a payer and receiver exchange the credit risk and market risk of an underlying asset.
  2. Economics

    Understanding the Top Line

    Top line refers to a company’s gross sales without any reductions for discounts or returns.
  3. Investing Basics

    How Does a Strangle Work?

    A strangle is the sale or purchase of both a put and call option on the same underlying investment with the same expiration.
  4. Economics

    What's a Stock Keeping Unit (SKU)?

    A SKU, or bar code, is a unique identification code that retail and wholesale sellers use to track their inventory of products and services.
  5. Economics

    What Is a Quota?

    In business, quota usually refers to the sales target for a salesperson or a sales team.
  6. Economics

    Understanding the Product Life Cycle

    Product life cycle is the period of time during which a product is conceived and developed, brought to market and eventually removed from the market.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining Price Targets

    A price target is what an investment analyst projects a security’s future price to be.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Present Value Interest Factor of Annuity (PVIFA)

    PVIFA can be used to calculate the present value of a series of annuities by considering cash flows and depreciation.
  9. Economics

    What Does Infrastructure Mean?

    Examples of infrastructure include mass transit, communication, sewage, water and electric systems, plus roads, bridges and tunnels.
  10. Economics

    Calculating the GDP Price Deflator

    The GDP price deflator adjusts gross domestic product by removing the effect of rising prices. It shows how much an economy’s GDP is really growing.
  11. Economics

    Explaining Consumer Discretionary

    Consumer discretionary is a term from economics that refers to the sector of the economy that produces goods and services that are nonessential.
  12. Economics

    What's a Centrally Planned Economy?

    A centrally planned economy is one where the government controls the country’s supply and demand of goods and services.
  13. Insurance

    How Does Cash-Value Life Insurance Work?

    Cash-value life insurance pays a beneficiary upon the death of the policyholder, and accumulates a cash value during the policyholder’s lifetime.
  14. Investing Basics

    What are Cash Equivalents?

    Cash equivalents are money market instruments.
  15. Investing Basics

    Understanding the Capital Gains Tax

    A capital gains tax is imposed on the profits realized when an investor or corporation sells an asset for a higher price than its purchase price.
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