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  1. What are Business Ethics?
    Investing

    What are Business Ethics?

    Business ethics is the system of laws and guidelines by which business professionals and corporations operate in a fair, legal and moral fashion. It’s a broad topic, covering everything from a corporation’s ...
  2. What is Globalization?
    Investing

    What is Globalization?

    As a business term, globalization refers to the tendency of international trade, investments, information technology and outsourced manufacturing to weave the economies of diverse countries together.
  3. How a Monopoly Works
    Economics

    How a Monopoly Works

    In economics, a monopoly occurs when one company is the sole (or nearly sole) provider of a good or service within an industry. This potentially allows that company to become powerful enough to prevent ...
  4. What
    Economics

    What "Unemployment" Really Means

    Unemployment occurs when a person who is actively searching for employment is unable to find work. The most frequently cited measure of unemployment is the unemployment rate. This is the number of unemployed ...
  5. What's a Marginal Tax Rate?
    Personal Finance

    What's a Marginal Tax Rate?

    The marginal tax rate is based on a progressive tax system, where tax rates for an individual will increase as income rises. This method of taxation aims to fairly tax individuals based upon their earnings, ...
  6. Macroeconomics
    Economics

    Macroeconomics

    Macroeconomics studies the performance of an economy as a whole. While microeconomics focuses on the decisions, spending and performance of individuals or single businesses, macroeconomics focuses on aggregate ...
  7. Law of Demand
    Economics

    Law of Demand

    The law of demand is one of the most fundamental principles in microeconomics. It's all about how price affects demand. According to the law of demand, for all other things remaining constant, the lower ...
  8. Systematic Risk
    Investing

    Systematic Risk

    Systematic risk, also known as volatility, non-diversifiable risk or market risk, is the risk everyone assumes when investing in a market. Think of it as the overall, aggregate risk that comes from things ...
  9. Factors Of Production
    Economics

    Factors Of Production

    Factors of production is an economic term describing the general inputs used to produce goods and services to make a profit. Under the classical view of economics, the factors of production consist of ...
  10. Disposable Income
    Investing

    Disposable Income

    Disposable income is the money a person has left over after all taxes have been paid. Other deductions that may affect the amount of disposable income are employment deductions for things like health insurance. ...
  11. Payback Period
    Investing

    Payback Period

    Payback period is the time it takes for an investment to generate an amount of income or cash equal to the cost of the investment. The shorter the payback period, the better the investment is judged to ...
  12. Capital Structure
    Investing

    Capital Structure

    Capital structure is the combination of the debt and equity a company uses to finance its long-term operations and growth.
  13. The Cash Conversion Cycle
    Investing

    The Cash Conversion Cycle

    Cash conversion cycle, or net operating cycle, is the number of days it takes a business to convert its production inputs into cash receipts. The calculation is commonly used by analysts to measure the ...
  14. Variable Costs
    Investing

    Variable Costs

    Variable costs go up when a company produces more goods or services, and go down when it produces fewer goods or services. This is compared to fixed costs, which do not change in proportion to production ...
  15. Arm's Length Transaction
    Investing

    Arm's Length Transaction

    An arm’s length transaction describes business deals in which the buyer and seller act independently and with no interest in the other’s benefit.
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