Welcome to the wild and wonderful world of Debt Securities. In this part of the guide you will learn the basic definitions and calculation concerning fixed income securities. This study guide is designed so that every LOS is answered. However, if you do not understand a concept, be sure to refer to the reading recommended by the CFA Institute or one of Investopedia's tutorials.

We'll start with the basics of debt investments in the first half of the section. In the second half, we'll examine bond analysis and valuation. The first portion of this section will describe a bond's features. The next portion will mainly cover the 10 risks of debt investments before moving on to more challenging concepts.

If the topic of debt securities is new to you or you haven't reviewed its theory for a while, you may want to check out the following tutorial: Bond and Debt Basics



Bond Features

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