Liabilities - Introduction

This chapter will focus on the liability side of the balance sheet, particularly current and long-term liabilities including capital and operating leases. Pay close attention to the section concerning the classification of leases as capital vs. operating, and how each classification affects other accounts. This concept is tested heavily in the CFA Level 1 exam.

Current Liability Basics


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  1. Long-Term Liabilities

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  2. Other Current Liabilities

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  3. Liability

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  4. Synthetic Lease

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  5. Operating Lease

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  6. Limited Liability

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