You should keep three things in mind when making comparisons among different mutual funds:
 

  1. Client objectives
  2. Suitable fund choices
  3. Individual fund features

Start with the client's objectives: What is the client's time frame and what are his or her expectations concerning return, risk tolerance, and so on? How much investment experience does the client have? Next, compare mutual funds with similar profiles and investment objectives. Comparing funds that are measured against different performance benchmarks is an exercise in futility that could also get you in serious trouble with your compliance department. Always present funds that are setting out with similar investment objectives and are measured against the same benchmarks, such as the S&P 500. Finally, decide what features of each fund would fit your client's personal financial needs - for example, regular distributions, fund family exchanges, and so on. Below are a few examples of each point of comparison.

Client Objectives
First, know your customer. This rule applies to everything you will do as a Series 6 registered representative, and it is the first rule to consider when comparing the 8,000+ mutual funds on the market today.

Typical questions to ask include:

  1. Does your client want growth over a long period of time?
  2. Is your customer's risk tolerance low and does he call you whenever there is a hiccup in the market, even though he is still years away from retirement?
  3. Is your client elderly and looking for something safe that provides a steady stream of income without much fluctuation in net asset value?

These questions and many others will need to be addressed before you can research the available options.
 

  • If the answer to the first question is "yes", the client is looking for capital appreciation and may not be too bothered by periodic fluctuations in the market. He or she might consider a growth or aggressive growth fund.
     
  • The client that answers yes to question 2  the client  should remain in an equity fund investor because there are a few years left between now and retirement and he needs a vehicle to get him there; so perhaps you will recommend several growth and income funds or balanced funds to temper those market ups and downs that make him so nervous.
     
  • The needs of the third client, an elderly widower, are markedly different from the client who has answered yes to question number one. An elderly client might want to consider a number of bond funds that contain a diverse portfolio of interest-paying, safe debt securities.

Suitable Fund Choices
Selecting the "best" funds is not the ultimate goal of the investment representative. Selecting the best fund for your individual client should be. So, the starting point in selecting a mutual fund is to clearly define a client's investment objectives, and then match the objective to the client's risk tolerance before matching the client to a mutual fund. Investment representatives must recognize the many dimensions of a mutual fund and then exercise good judgment in order to make an appropriate selection.

Compare Mutual Fund "Apples" with "Apples"
You must compare mutual funds that have similar stated investment objectives. It is folly to recommend a mutual fund that returned 15% last year because you want to impress a wealthy client who tells you that Fred at The Other Bank recommended the Boring-but-safe Fund and that he is simply looking for a way to preserve his capital while staying ahead of inflation. In other words, don't compare a balanced fund with an aggressive growth fund, or a municipal bond fund with an equity income fund.

Individual Features for Individual Investors
Depending on your client's needs, you will recommend mutual funds from particular investment companies that offer certain benefits. These options may include conversion or exchange privileges, systematic accumulation and withdrawal plans, tax reporting, contribution amount tracking and other features. Many of these benefits will allow your younger clients to conveniently add small amounts of money to their mutual funds, while your retirees can depend on monthly checks from systematic withdrawals as their retirement funds continue to grow. At the end of each year, investors will receive a 1099 from the fund company detailing the tax information necessary for income tax filing.

Fees and Performance
Both of these factors should be considered when comparing mutual funds. A fund with higher-than-average fees may well produce a lower-than-average performance. When analyzing bond funds, it's important to take after tax return and total return into account, not just the dividend yield.



Performance

Related Articles
  1. Investing

    How to Sell Mutual Funds to Your Clients

    Learn about the various talking points you should cover when discussing mutual funds with clients and how explaining their benefits can help you close the sale.
  2. Financial Advisor

    When Are Mutual Funds Right for Your Client?

    Find out what factors determine whether mutual funds are right for your client, including risk tolerance, investment goals and tax implications.
  3. Financial Advisor

    After Poor Performance, Now a Mutual Fund Tax Hit?

    If the performance of mutual funds in 2014 wasn't bad enough, here comes a tax hit from liquidations.
  4. Financial Advisor

    A Mutual Funds Guide for Young Investors

    Learn how mutual funds work, why they are so popular and how younger investors can get started by putting mutual funds in their IRAs or 401(k)s.
  5. Investing

    What You Need to Know About Mutual Funds

    Mutual funds are a good investment opportunity, but investors should know how they operate.
  6. Financial Advisor

    Mutual Funds: How Many is Too Many? (VTSMX, VBMFX)

    How many mutual funds are too many when it comes to a well diversified portfolio?
  7. Investing

    Looking to Buy Mutual Funds Online? Here Is How

    Learn how to buy mutual funds online; discover which websites offer mutual fund trading services, how to choose a fund and typical fees.
  8. Financial Advisor

    Does Loyalty to a Single Fund Family Make Sense?

    Does loyalty to a single fund family make sense? Here are some things to think about when it comes to dealing with just one fund provider.
  9. Financial Advisor

    Manage Your Clients' Expectations

    You can't control how they react to the market, but you can help them understand the reality of the situation.
Frequently Asked Questions
  1. What is the difference between yield and return?

    While both terms are often used to describe the performance of an investment, yield and return are not one and the same ...
  2. What are the Differences Among a Real Estate Agent, a broker and a Realtor?

    Learn how agents, realtors, and brokers are often considered the same, but in reality, these real estate positions have different ...
  3. What is the difference between amortization and depreciation?

    Because very few assets last forever, one of the main principles of accrual accounting requires that an asset's cost be proportionally ...
  4. Which is better, a fixed or variable rate loan?

    A variable interest rate loan is a loan in which the interest rate charged on the outstanding balance varies as market interest ...
Trading Center