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Basic Economic Concepts - Economic Indicators


Basic Indicators
The following basic economic indicators are important to understand:

  • Gross Domestic Product (GDP) - is the total amount of all goods and services produced in the country. This includes consumer spending, government spending and business inventories. Real GDP is a variant that takes out the impact of inflation, so that GDP can be compared over time. Real GDP is the basic measure of business activity and tracks the business cycle.

  • Consumer Price Index (CPI) -is a measure of the price of a basket of goods and services; increases to this index indicate an increase in inflation.

  • Producer Price Index (PPI) -is a measure of the price of commercial items, such as farm products and industrial commodities. PPI indicates the cost to produce items and is the leading indicator of inflation.

  • Trade deficit - resultswhen a country's imports exceed its exports. The United States usually has a trade deficit.

  • Trade surplus - resultswhen a country's exports exceed its imports.

  • Balance of payments (BOP) - is the amount of foreign currency taken in minus the amount of domestic currency paid out; the United States usually has a balance of payments deficit.

  • Unemployment rate - the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases employment numbers each month that note the number of employed and unemployed people in the United States, as well as the percentage of unemployed. Increases in the unemployment rate tend to occur when the economy declines and vice versa.


Exam Tips and Tricks
The number of unemployed and percentage of unemployed may seem redundant, but they are very different. If the population increases, the number of unemployed may increase, but the percentage could remain the same.


Leading, coincident and lagging indicators
Certain economic indicators serve as barometers of economic activity. These are divided into three categories: leading indicators, coincident (or current) indicators and lagging indicators.

Leading indicators preview signs of improvement or decline in economic conditions. Some of these leading indicators include plant and equipment orders, money supply, stock prices, consumer expectations, average work week for production workers and average weekly claims for unemployment insurance.

Coincident indicators coincide with current economic activity. Examples include nonfarm employment, industrial production, manufacturing and trade sales, and personal income minus transfer payments such as Social Security, disability benefits and unemployment compensation.

Lagging indicators are signs that do not emerge until after a change in economic conditions. They include the unemployment rate, business spending, labor costs, bank loans outstanding and bank interest rates.

Business Cycle
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