1. ESOs: Introduction
  2. ESOs: Accounting For Employee Stock Options
  3. ESOs: Using the Black-Scholes Model
  4. ESOs: Using the Binomial Model
  5. ESOs: Dilution - Part 1
  6. ESOs: Dilution - Part 2
  7. ESOs: Conclusion

by David Harper

In this tutorial we review the accounting and valuation treatment of employee stock options (ESOs) and illustrate the best ways for investors to incorporate them into their analysis of stock. In the next section, we begin with a summary of the accounting treatment of ESOs, and then in the third and fourth sections we progress into a review of the primary options-pricing models: the Black-Scholes and its likely successor in 2005, the binomial model. In the fifth and sixth sections, we will consider adjustments you can make to incorporate the cost impact of stock options into your equity valuations.


ESOs: Accounting For Employee Stock Options
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    What is a Stock Option?

    An employee stock option is a right given to an employee to buy a certain number of company stock shares at a certain time and price in the future.
  2. Trading

    The Benefits And Value Of Stock Options

    The pros and cons of corporate stock options have been debated since the incentive was created. Learn more about stock option basics and the cost of stock options.
  3. Trading

    Circumvent Limitations of Black-Scholes Model

    Mathematical or quantitative model-based trading continues to gain momentum, despite major failures like the financial crisis of 2008-09, which was attributed to the flawed use of trading models. ...
  4. Investing

    Examples To Understand The Binomial Option Pricing Model

    Binomial option pricing model, based on risk neutral valuation, offers a unique alternative to Black-Scholes. Here are detailed examples with calculations using Binomial model and explanation ...
Frequently Asked Questions
  1. What are Common Examples of Monopolistic Markets?

    Discover what causes real instances of market monopoly, how it persists and where monopoly privilege is most common in the ...
  2. What is the gold standard?

    The gold standard is a monetary system where a country's currency or paper money has a value directly linked to gold, but ...
  3. What's the most expensive stock of all time?

    The most expensive publicly traded stock of all time is Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway.
  4. What is a "socially responsible" mutual fund?

    As the name suggests, socially responsible mutual funds invest exclusively in socially responsible investments.
Trading Center