Chinese monetary policy has recently emerged in the headlines, as America and several other major economies have been pushing for the reevaluation of the yuan. Currently, the yuan is pegged to the greenback at approximately 6.83 yuan per U.S. dollar. Only mild currency fluctuations are observed within the tight trading range of the fixed exchange rate, which has been essentially unchanged in the past two years. (Tap into a world of possibilities by going beyond the simple pro- or anti-dollar trade. Find out how in Make The Currency Cross Your Boss.)
IN PICTURES: 10 Biggest Losers In Finance

So What's Going On?
Despite the international pressure, the Chinese government has repeated that any changes to its currency will be directed solely by internal economic guidelines, foreign pressures are building up. The United States, along with other nations, feel that the yuan is artificially held at depressed levels in order to guarantee the competitiveness of Chinese exports.

Economic theory suggests that as long as the yuan remains undervalued, foreign companies will continue purchasing cheap Chinese goods; if the currency is allowed to appreciate, the same goods become relatively more expensive in comparison to similar products produced elsewhere. This basic premise is the foundation of the ongoing debate. (Congress often debates pressuring China to appreciate its currency, but the yuan/dollar peg has benefits for both countries. Read more, in Why China's Currency Tangos With The USD.)

What Will the Effect Be?
In 2005, China allowed a 2% revaluation of the yuan, but since July of 2008, the peg has been carefully maintained. Now, there is the possibility that China will allow the yuan to appreciate another 2-5% against the U.S. dollar, an announcement that might have a significant impact on world trade.

While the general relationship between foreign exchange rates and global trade is fairly intuitive, if the yuan appreciates, Chinese goods will not be as cheap, thus other nations can increase their international trade output - actual results are not always dictated by theory. The impact that a Chinese foreign exchange policy modification will have on America can only be determined after the change has been made.

Various arguments have been made that appreciation of the yuan will result in either U.S. job loss, job gain or will have no immediate impacts at all.

As the Chinese economy has regularly seen double-digit annual growth, appreciating by nearly 12% in the previous quarter, the suggested yuan reforms may slow down the soaring economy. China will no longer be able to flood world markets with cheap products that drive out international competition. An increase in Chinese consumer good prices may open the gate to competitors.

Although potential inflation may result, many argue that an increase in the price levels of Chinese supplies will allow United States manufacturing to gain global market share. American firms will not only be able to gain a competitive edge in domestic markets, but will be able to compete in foreign countries, including China as well. Naturally, such an occurrence would lead to elevated levels of employment in the manufacturing sector.

International demand would not only increase for relatively cheaper American goods, but for those of other Asian countries as well, who have been unable to compete with Chinese exports. (Everything you need to know - from the different types of tariffs to their effects on the local economy - can be found in The Basics Of Tariffs And Trade Barriers.)

But What If …
The above scenario logically adheres to economic trade theory; yet, there are many valid arguments suggesting that the positive impacts implied by the revaluation are overly optimistic. Geoff Lewis, head of investment services at JPMorgan Asset Management contends that the currency reforms will be "economically meaningless…. It's more to be seen as doing something, not for its real impact."

Movement away from the current peg might be a symbolic gesture to appease the United States without having any material merit. Chinese firms can comfortably continue supplying goods at reduced margins, in order to maintain their market shares and influence in overseas markets. Rather than reducing their exports, China can directly absorb the financial losses by maintaining the same selling price of its products.

Furthermore, the prices that consumers pay for their Chinese-made toys, for example, do not only reflect production costs, but incorporate domestic transportation costs and store margins. These latter components compose the main bulk of the underlying price tag. If sellers do not cut their prices in perfect tandem with the gradual appreciation of the yuan, then department stores will be the main benefactors, rather than consumers.

The Bottom Line
The full impact of the Chinese currency revaluation can only be speculated, but not actually known until the policy comes into effect. While American policy makers argue that appreciation of the yuan will lead to an increase in employment, some have argued the opposite, saying that it will actually decrease: if the price of inputs goes up, so will the cost of manufacturing, driving some firms out of business.

Still feeling uninformed? Read this week's financial news highlights in Water Cooler Finance: Buffett's Armed and Greece Keeps Falling.

Related Articles
  1. Stock Analysis

    An Introduction To The Indian Stock Market

    Most trading in the Indian stock market occurs through its two exchanges – the Bombay Stock Exchange and the National Stock Exchange.
  2. Savings

    How Americans Can Open a Bank Account In Thailand

    Have your paperwork in order and be sure to shop around.
  3. Chart Advisor

    Copper Continues Its Descent

    Copper prices have been under pressure lately and based on these charts it doesn't seem that it will reverse any time soon.
  4. Forex Fundamentals

    How to Buy Chinese Yuan

    Discover the different options that are available to investors who want to obtain exposure to the Chinese yuan, including ETFs and ETNs.
  5. Markets

    Are EM Stocks Finally Emerging?

    Many investors are looking at emerging market (EM) stocks and wonder if it’s time to step back in, while others wonder if we’ll see further declines.
  6. Markets

    What Slow Global Growth Means for Portfolios

    While U.S. growth remains relatively resilient, global growth continues to slip.
  7. Economics

    How to Invest in the Philippines' Stock Market

    The Philippines offers more long-term growth potential than most economies around the world. Here's how to play it.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Next Big ETFs Might Be From Latin America

    These ETFs are an excellent place to start for any investor interested in betting on Latin America.
  9. Investing

    2 Investing Implications of Higher US Rates

    While U.S. economic data continue to come in mixed, the numbers still point to decent U.S. economic growth.
  10. Stock Analysis

    What Markets Poised to Benefit if the Fed Waits?

    Late last month, the Fed reminded that a 2015 rate hike is still a possibility; there are certain segments of the market that are more sensitive to changes.
  1. Is Malaysia a developed country?

    Despite undergoing rapid economic development over the past five decades, Malaysia is not considered a developed country, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do mutual funds have CUSIP numbers?

    The Committee on Uniform Securities Identification Procedures (CUSIP) number is a standardized identification system used ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Is Mexico an emerging market economy?

    Mexico meets all the criteria of an emerging market economy. The country's gross domestic product, or GDP, per capita beats ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why should an investor include an allocation to the telecommunications sector in ...

    An investor should include an allocation to the telecommunications sector in his portfolio, because telecom offers an investor ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What portion of the telecommunications sector will benefit most from continued growth ...

    The portion of the telecommunications sector that is projected to benefit most from the continued growth in the use of cellphones ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between a greenfield investment and a regular investment?

    A greenfield investment is a particular type of investment where an international company begins a new operation in a foreign ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Black Friday

    1. A day of stock market catastrophe. Originally, September 24, 1869, was deemed Black Friday. The crash was sparked by gold ...
  2. Turkey

    Slang for an investment that yields disappointing results or turns out worse than expected. Failed business deals, securities ...
  3. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  4. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  5. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  6. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
Trading Center