The life of the working mother is anything but stress-free. Not only is she responsible for duties on the job, but when she gets home she has children to tend to, a house to clean, bills to pay and meals to cook. Seemingly gone are the days of the stay-at-home mom whose only concerns were to raise the children and tend to the house. Many modern mothers are the breadwinners, the decision makers and somehow find a way to juggle their career and their family. Working mothers truly do have it all, but it is not without paying a hefty price.

Career and Family Stress
While the working mother certainly appears to have it all, it is not easy to maintain a successful career and a happy home life. Managing the stress of a career, family life, bills and more can make for a very hectic life. For many mothers, having a career is not a choice, but an absolute necessity. For many families, one income simply isn't enough to support a family. If the mother is a single parent, her financial concerns can be even more daunting.

Work/Life Balance Can Be a Problem
Not everyone has the luxury of working a job from Monday to Friday between the hours of nine and five. Some employers require employees to work weekend shifts. Other employers require mandatory overtime from employees. Work/life balance can be a major challenge for working mothers when their employers require even more of their time than a 40 hour work week will allow. While a career is important, a working mother needs to be able to balance her career and her family harmoniously.

Forced to Rely on Daycare
A major source of stress for some working mothers is knowing they have to rely heavily on the assistance of a nannies or daycare centers to care for their children. It is difficult for many mothers to know that they are paying someone else to tend to their children. Many working mothers would rather be there themselves. Additionally, childcare expenses tend to be quite expensive. According to, the average cost of full-time childcare in the United States is $611 per month. Factor in this cost over the course of four years, and you have one major expense on your hands.

One-Income Families Are Quickly Fading Away
In past generations, a traditional family dynamic included a father figure who provided for the family and worked out of the house. The mother often stayed home, raised the children, and cooked and cleaned for the family. Today, those days seem to be gone almost entirely. Many families need two incomes just to scrape by financially. In today's modern age, it appears that many working mothers do not have a choice whether they want a career or not. Many mothers today work to help support their families.

The Bottom Line
While there are still some families that are able to survive on one income, they are certainly becoming few and far between. Modern mothers are taking on more than women in past generations have had to juggle. While the life of a working mother can be stressful, with a strong work/life balance they truly can have it all.

Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    How Tech Can Help with 3 Behavioral Finance Biases

    Even if you’re a finance or statistics expert, you’re not immune to common decision-making mistakes that can negatively impact your finances.
  2. Savings

    Should You Look at 529 Plans Outside Your State?

    529 savings plans are not restricted by geography. So if your in-state offering has high fees or poor investment choices, look elsewhere.
  3. Stock Analysis

    Home Depot: Can its Shares Continue Climbing?

    Home Depot has outperformed the market by a wide margin in the last 12 months. Is this sustainable?
  4. Savings

    These 10 Habits Will Help You Reach Financial Freedom

    Learn 10 key habits for achieving financial freedom, including smart budgeting, staying abreast of new tax deductions and the importance of proper maintenance.
  5. Budgeting

    How Much Will it Cost to Become President In 2016?

    The 2016 race to the White House will largely be determined by who can spend the most money. Here is a look at how much it will cost to win the presidency.
  6. Budgeting

    Six Most Popular Hobbies You Can Do For Free

    Does your budget not allow you to have expensive hobbies? Here are six great ideas for occupying your free time without spending money.
  7. Home & Auto

    How Property Taxes Are Calculated

    Property taxes are calculated through use of the mill levy and the assessed property values.
  8. Home & Auto

    This Is How You Could Live in the Philippines on $1,000 a Month

    Consider what your life might be like in the Philippines on a $1,000 budget, and determine whether this Southeast Asian country is for you.
  9. Home & Auto

    This Is How You Could Live in Thailand on $1,000 a Month

    Discover what kind of life you can lead on $1,000 per month in Thailand, one of the top expatriate and tourist destinations in Southeast Asia.
  10. Personal Finance

    5 Reasons Inmates Should Be Taught Financial Literacy

    Learn five reasons why financial literacy is a great way to prevent inmates from relapsing into a life of crime after release from prison.
  1. Can my IRA be garnished for child support?

    Though some states protect IRA savings from garnishment of any kind, most states lift this exemption in cases where the account ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does a bank determine what my discretionary income is when making a loan decision?

    Discretionary income is the money left over from your gross income each month after taking out taxes and paying for necessities. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do alimony and child support factor into my taxable income?

    The Internal Revenue Service, or IRS, applies a different tax treatment to alimony than child support. Most forms of alimony ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the range of deductibles offered with various health insurance plans?

    A wide range of possible deductibles are available with health insurance plans, starting as low as a few hundred dollars ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do I know how much of my income should be discretionary?

    While there is no hard rule for how much of a person's income should be discretionary, Inc. magazine points out that it would ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What proportion of my income should I put into my demand deposit account?

    Generally speaking, aim to keep between two months and six months worth of your fixed expenses in your demand deposit accounts. ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Trading Center