If you work for a larger corporation there's a good chance that you have access to company stock as part of your compensation package. Your company may issue stock options or you may have access to company stock in your 401(k) retirement plan or an employee stock purchase plan. Here's what you need to know about managing company stock.

SEE: Rolling Over Company Stock

It's Not Different
When you think about your company stock, do you see it as a different kind of investment than you would make in the stock market? Does it feel more stable and secure to you since you know so much about the company? Holding company stock as part of your overall investment portfolio is no different than buying the stock of another company through your brokerage account.

The truth is that you likely have very little knowledge of news and events that would directly affect the price of the stock. It's illegal for company management to give you advance knowledge of coming events and if you're one of the decision makers that has access to the knowledge, you're aware of the tight restrictions you have when trading your stock.

Don't adopt a false sense of security because you work there. History is filled with past employees of now bankrupt companies that were left holding worthless company stock, (Enron, Lehman Brothers, etc.)

SEE: Digging For Profitable Delistings

Don't Own More Than 10%.
If your main investment dollars are in a 401(k), no more than 10% of your 401(k) should be in company stock and some experts advise much less. If you have investments outside of your 401(k), your company stock should make up no more than 10% of your entire portfolio. How would you feel if you lost 10% of your portfolio? If that scares you, trim your company stock down to 5% or even less.

How About Company Stock Options?
Many employees make the mistake of letting their stock options gain too much value, because they don't understand how they work. They also don't understand that the value of stock options degrade over time. If you're awarded stock options, typically you receive a certain amount of options that have to go through a vesting period - this means that you can't exercise these options right away. Once you're able to exercise the options, you want the options to be above the strike price before you exercise.

Employee stock options not only have a minimum amount of time that goes by before you exercise the option, there's also a maximum. Count these options as part of your overall portfolio and although you shouldn't let this part of your portfolio become too large, when to exercise the options is complicated and best done with the help of a trusted financial adviser. Make sure they discuss the tax implications with you.

SEE: Get The Most Out Of Employee Stock Options

Should You Sell?
According to Reuters, purchasing company stock is on the decline and for good reason. For investors without the time or experience to manage individual stocks, mutual funds, some exchange traded funds and index funds are better, more diversified alternatives to owning single company stocks, even if the company happens to be your employer. If you don't have a high level of stock market knowledge, owning company stock outside of stock options is a bad idea.

The Bottom Line
The company stock you own in one of the many forms should not violate the rules of good diversification. No more than 10% of your portfolio should be in any one stock even if the company supplies your paycheck. Also remember that like any investment, company stock comes with the same risk as any other single stock. Don't hold a false sense of security since the company happens to employ you.

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