Online recruitment activity rose in eight of the 20 industries monitored by the U.S. Monster Employment Index, which tracks the online job demand in the United States. With so many jobs being advertised online, and so many being hired from online postings, it pays to know your way around an online job search. Here's what you need to know to find, and land, that dream job posted online.

IN PICTURES: 6 Hot Careers With Lots Of Jobs

    Know Where To Look
    You can't find the jobs if you don't know where to look. Start with aggregate sites like,,, and Just put "jobs" into a search engine and you'll get more hits than you know what to do with. To that end, you'll need a way to narrow down your search sites.

    If you are looking for a job in an industry with which you are already familiar, take a look at the sites of the big-name companies in your field. Almost every company will have a career section.

    Even better, industries often have field-specific sites; for example, check out for journalists in the U.S., or for law enforcement, firefighters and emergency medical personnel. The best way to find these sites is to either search for your job title and location, or by asking around your industry.

    Don't Get Stuck on Job TitleWhile you may consider yourself an account executive, the perfect job for you may be listed under a different job title. Try searching for synonyms, in this example consider sales executive or account leader, and if the site allows it, use category searches to get a broader look – just be sure you don't limit yourself by category either. (Learn what skills will help you land that job; read The 7 Most Universal Job Skills.)Keep Things ProfessionalWhen you have found the jobs you want to apply for, remember that applying online means your computer competency will be immediately apparent. If you can't figure out how to attach you resume to your email, and the job requires computer skills, you may not make it past the recruiter's inbox. If you aren't sure, ask a friend for help, or consider taking a basic computer skills course to brush up - and add it to your resume.When you apply online, make sure you use a professional email address, and attach your resume in a word document with the file saved as .doc, not .docx. If your potential employer can't open your resume, they will likely just delete it. Sending a file with an uncommon extension may cause your email to end up in the spam folder.Keep TrackWhether you're applying online or in-person, you need to keep track of the companies and positions you have applied to. The ease of applying online makes it easier to send duplicates and forget the details of a job posting when you are contacted. If you are reached by email, the latter isn't a big deal, but if your potential employer calls, you will want to know who you are talking to and about which position you are being contacted.This is especially important if you are giving out your cell phone number. Keep a notebook or printed record of the companies, positions, contact numbers and a few details for each position you apply to. (Keep on top of changes in the job market; read 4 New Job-Search Trends.)Follow Up in the Real WorldDon't get stuck in cyber land; follow up on jobs by calling. This will show you are serious about the position, and even if you aren't right for the one you applied for, a follow-up call could give you a lead on a similar position. Again, keep things professional; calling up and telling the recruiter how desperate you are for the job will make you seem immature and will not help your case.

    The Bottom Line
    As more and more people are hired through online job postings, make sure your computer skills are up to snuff. These quick tips will help you with your online job search and ensure you aren't overlooked because of a simple mistake. (Following these five tips will keep your resume out of the recycling bin. for further reading, check out How To Land A Finance Job Straight Out Of Undergrad.)

    Catch up on your financial news; read Water Cooler Finance: A Diving Dow And Rotting Eggs.

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