Vendors selling products related to the improvement of your home can be some of the most challenging salespeople to deal with. Why? Because it's easy to convince yourself to spend more money on your home. You spend lots of time there and you want any upgrades you make to be done right and to last for years. What's more, these sales professionals often require a visit to your house. It's much harder to get someone out of your house than it is to walk away from someone in a store. With that in mind, here are some of the high-pressure sales tactics you might face so you can prepare yourself to handle them effectively.

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Not only might you be upsold on the product you originally intended to purchase ("Builder's grade? That's primarily used for apartment buildings. I almost never sell those to homeowners!"), but once you have a salesman inside your house, they might feel free to point out other shortcomings or things you should consider purchasing. You might hear something like, "I noticed when I walked up to your house that your gutters need to be replaced" or "as long as you're remodeling the kitchen, why don't we take a look at your bathrooms?" (While it may pay to spice up your home, don't over improve it. For more, see 6 Tips To Sell Your Home Faster.)

Amazing Warranties
Let's say you're considering having a window replaced, and one of the main differences between the mid-grade window and the high-grade window is the warranty. The mid-grade window comes with a lifetime warranty; the high-grade window comes with a double lifetime warranty. The lifetime warranty will only cover the window while you are the homeowner, whereas the double lifetime warranty will stay with the home no matter who owns it. This sounds great, but the price difference between the two windows is a whopping $400.

If you have no plans to sell, this extra feature isn't worth the cost. Even if you are planning to sell, could you recoup the cost in the sales price of your home? If a buyer were looking at comparable sales when deciding how much to offer on your house, would they say, "But this house comes with a double lifetime warranty on all of its windows, so it's worth the extra $3,000 the seller is asking"? The subject probably wouldn't even come up. What's more, the double lifetime warranty does not cover accidental glass breakage, which is probably the window expense that people are most concerned about. (A home warranty may sound like a great form of protection against expensive unforeseen home repairs, but is it worth it? For more, see Do You Need A Home Warranty?)

Extremely Short Term Sales and Deals
Once you've discussed your options and narrowed down what you want, the sales person should offer you a price, in writing, for the work you want done. But in order to close the deal, you might be offered a sale or a price that is only valid for a very short time - say, 24 hours.

Don't feel pressured by what appears to be a one-time chance to save money. If there really is a sale that really is ending, it will probably come around again. There's also a chance that you could take your time to decide and, if you got a new quote six months later, you'd be offered the same deal.

Even if the special price expires and never comes back again, by taking your time to completely think through your decision, you'll be much more likely to make the right decision. This is more important in the long run than getting the best possible price. A deal is not a deal if you don't really want what you're being sold.

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Bottom Line
Dealing with high-pressure sales tactics can be challenging and even stressful. Just remember that it's your house and your money, and you don't have to make a decision immediately. Make sure that you only buy what you really want - not what someone else wants to sell you. (For related reading, see 6 Things You Think Add Value To Your Home But Really Don't.)

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