Investors can't seem to get enough of stories talking about what this or that famous investor is doing with his or her portfolio. In the latest example, news that George Soros has liquidated his gold holdings has some investors and commentators wondering whether the markets are looking at the end of an impressive run in gold. Whether Soros is right or wrong with this latest move, investors ought to consider some of the reasons to reject or copy his move.

TUTORIAL: Commodities: Gold

Less-Legitimate Reasons to Copy Soros
Playing a Different Game
Simply put, investors like Soros, Paulson, Gartman and the like are playing a different game than you or me. In many cases, the funds run by famous hedge fund managers are leveraged up the hilt, and have relatively inconsequential trading costs. What that means is that fund managers can sell on Monday, buy on Wednesday, sell again on Friday and make money all along the way. That's something that the average investor cannot do. Playing an anticipated 2% move makes sense in an environment of minimal taxation, minimal transaction costs and massive leverage. For the regular investor, it's a sure way to get poor quickly.

There is a difference between holding gold for price appreciation and holding it as an insurance policy or portfolio hedge. Gold tends to have low correlation with other financial assets and there is a credible argument that gold should have a permanent place in portfolios because of that diversification benefit. For those investors who like gold as insurance, it would make little sense to follow Soros. Selling all of your gold just because Soros does makes about as much sense as canceling your car insurance because your neighbor sold his car. (For related reading, see Gold: The Other Currency.)

Rebalancing
Although Soros reportedly sold all of his gold, famous investor moves are often presented without context. How much did they own? How much do they own? How large is the fund? What may look like bailing out of a position may in fact just be a portfolio rebalancing. For instance, a manager purporting to run a diversified fund may not be able to allow having a single position dominate or dictate the direction of the fund's performance. Likewise, some funds operate with statutory limits on position size and may have to trim positions to stay in compliance. (For more on George Soros, see George Soros: The Philosophy Of An Elite Investor.)

Lying
Another good reason not follow the actions of Soros, Paulson or any other high-profile fund manager is that you don't always, or even often, know what they're actually doing. Lying is rife in money management and financial journalism. Managers will lie to each other, they'll lie to reporters and they'll "plant" stories with reporters to skew coverage in the direction they want. Manipulating asset prices through the media has a long history, and the fact of the matter is that it can work. More than a couple of stocks have gone up on little more than a weakly-sourced rumor that a famed investor was buying or looking to buy.

At a bare minimum, investors should try to confirm rumors with U.S Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings. Few fund managers are going to risk the wrath of the SEC by outright lying in their filings. Unfortunately, these filings come well after the actual transactions, and may be entirely out of date by the time an investor can see them, to say nothing of the fact that some funds are outside the jurisdiction of the SEC. (For more, see Using Public SEC Filings To Analyze Companies.)

Legitimate Reasons to Copy Soros
Maybe Gold Has Topped Out
It is at least worth considering the possibility that Soros could be right and that gold has had the best of its run. If gold is peaking, or in the midst of a parabolic blow-off, it is certainly wise to look for the exits. Although it is tempting to stay to the last minute and get every dollar of appreciation that's possible, that is also very dangerous. Those who stay too long often get caught in a rush for the exits and lose a lot of their gains.

Along similar lines, Soros may believe that the markets have seen the peak of fear. There is almost certainly more fallout to come from the European banking and sovereign debt messes, but the U.S. seems to have managed to survive the worst of the crisis. Should the U.S. Congress find that the voters now demand some real solutions and sustained fiscal discipline, gold could have a much harder path upward.

Other Assets May Be Cheaper
If big names like Soros are in fact getting out of gold, there is another angle to consider - the rise of gold has left other attractive assets looking cheap by comparison. One of the chronic complaints about gold is that it has value, but produces no value. In contrast, land can produce both near-term cash flow and long-term price appreciation (timberland produces lumber, farmland produces crops or rent, etc.). While any investor can buy gold or gold ETFs, land is harder to purchase and the combination of a big run in gold and a terrible housing market has created some relative value opportunities in some types of land.

TUTORIAL: The Greatest Investors: George Soros

The Bottom Line
It's unrealistic to tell investors to just ignore whatever Buffett, Soros or Paulson have to say about the market or what they are doing with their money. After all, these men did not get to be wealthy just by accident or luck, and they often have valuable insights on the market. That said, every investor operates in his or her own world and what makes sense for Soros or another hedge fund manager may have little or nothing to do with an individual investor's situation. Hedge fund managers are paid extremely well to outperform each and every year, and that encourages a great deal more risk-taking and turnover than is necessary for an individual investor.

When it comes to gold, investors should certainly care what an experienced commodity investor like Soros is seeing in the market, but it is simply one data point to consider. Soros has been wrong before and may be wrong now, and investors may be holding gold for different reasons and with different expectations. Investors should absolutely consider whether gold has gone too far too fast or whether it makes up too large a percentage of their portfolio. Blindly copying the moves of even the most successful investors is often a recipe for profoundly disappointing performance at the individual level. (For related reading, see The 5 Most Feared Figures In Finance.)

Related Articles
  1. Economics

    How Warren Buffett Made Berkshire A Winner

    Berkshire Fine Spinning Associated and Hathaway Manufacturing Company merged in 1955 to form Berkshire Hathaway.
  2. Products and Investments

    There's a Reason They're Called Junk Bonds

    The closing of Third Avenue Managemet's Focused Credit Fund is a warning to investors and advisors. Beware the junk.
  3. Stock Analysis

    Tribune Media: An Activist Investment Analysis (TRCO)

    Learn more about the breakup of Tribune Company, once a powerful newspaper and broadcasting giant, and the role of activist investor Cliff Robbins.
  4. Stock Analysis

    Air Products and Chemicals: An Activist Investment Analysis (APD)

    Learn about the productive, and uncommonly friendly, activist investment made by Bill Ackman into Air Products and Chemicals.
  5. Investing News

    Building a Case for the Bulls: 3 Opinions

    These three big names are bullish on the economy. Are there good times ahead?
  6. Stock Analysis

    The Top 5 Small Cap Gold Stocks for 2016 (KGC, SBGL)

    Learn about the factors that led to gold's underperformance, factors that may lead a gold rally and five micro-cap gold stocks to consider.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Performance Review: Commodities in 2015

    Learn how commodities took a big hit in 2015 with a huge variance in performances. Discover how the major commodities performed over the year.
  8. Stock Analysis

    The Top 5 Micro-Cap Gold Stocks for 2016 (PGLC)

    Discover five micro-cap gold miners that are well-positioned for a positive year in 2016, even if gold prices remain under pressure.
  9. Investing News

    Icahn's Bet on Cheniere Energy: Should You Follow?

    Investing legend Carl Icahn continues to lose money on Cheniere Energy, but he's increasing his stake. Should you follow his lead?
  10. Investing

    3 Things About International Investing and Currency

    As world monetary policy continues to diverge rocking bottom on interest rates while the Fed raises them, expect currencies to continue their bumpy ride.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is securitization?

    Securitization is the process of taking an illiquid asset, or group of assets, and through financial engineering, transforming ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can hedge funds trade penny stocks?

    Hedge funds can trade penny stocks. In fact, hedge funds can trade in just about any type of security, including medium- ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are hedge funds regulated by FINRA?

    Alternative investment vehicles such as hedge funds offer investors a wider range of possibilities due to certain exceptions ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Should mutual funds be subject to more regulation?

    Mutual funds, when compared to other types of pooled investments such as hedge funds, have very strict regulations. In fact, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Can hedge fund returns be replicated?

    You can replicate hedge fund returns to a degree but not perfectly. Most replication strategies underperform hedge funds ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Can foreign investors invest in US hedge funds?

    U.S. hedge funds are open to accredited investors. When they distribute profits to investors, those proceeds are taxed at ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Socially Responsible Investment - SRI

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature of the business the company conducts. Common ...
  2. Inverted Yield Curve

    An interest rate environment in which long-term debt instruments have a lower yield than short-term debt instruments of the ...
  3. Presidential Election Cycle (Theory)

    A theory developed by Yale Hirsch that states that U.S. stock markets are weakest in the year following the election of a ...
  4. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
  5. Flight To Quality

    The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This ...
  6. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
Trading Center