A lifelong goal that many citizens strive to achieve is homeownership. While many people own their own homes in today's society, this wasn't always the case. Historically, families either needed to build their own homes or rent a home from someone else. While both renting and buying have their own sets of financial advantages, renting does appear to have an edge when the economy is poor. There are tremendous financial benefits to renting as opposed to buying a house of your own. Here is a look at 10 reasons why renters have the better financial deal over homeowners.

No Maintenance Costs or Repair Bills
A definite advantage that renters have over homeowners is that they have no maintenance costs or repair bills to pay off. When you rent a property, your landlord is responsible for all maintenance and repair costs. If an appliance stops working or your roof starts to leak, you do not have any financial responsibility to have these things fixed. Homeowners, on the other hand, are responsible for all of their own repair, maintenance and renovation costs. Depending on what the repair is, these costs can be quite extensive.

Access to Amenities
Another financial benefit to renting over buying a house of your own is having access to amenities that would otherwise be a huge expense. Luxuries such as an in-ground pool or a fitness center come standard at many midscale to upscale apartment complexes with no additional charge to tenants. If a homeowner wants to match these amenities, he or she can expect to pay thousands of dollars in installation and maintenance costs.

No Real Estate Taxes
An obvious benefit that renters have over homeowners is that they do not have to pay real estate taxes. Real estate taxes can be a hefty burden for homeowners and vary by county. Although property tax calculations can be complex, they are generally determined based on the estimated property value of your house. With houses getting larger and larger, property taxes can be a significant financial burden.

No Big Down Payment
Another area where renters have the better financial deal is upon signing. You do not have to have a huge down payment saved up to move into a rental property. While the exact amount you need to move in varies from case to case, the total amount is significantly less than you would need to buy a house.

According to a graph released by the New York Times, many landlords require a rental deposit equal to the amount of one month's rent while a down payment for a house is much higher. For example, with a 5% deposit on a house that has a market value of $175,000 your move-in costs start at $8,750, which is much more than the average one-month rent rate. Also, those buying will want to save up much more than 5% for their initial down payment because the bigger the down payment, the better. By renting you can avoid the high initial down payment costs.

Shaky Market Creating More Renters
While many experts claim the U.S. Housing market is making a full recovery, others aren't so sure. An article written by International Business Times claims that the market is just now stabilizing and the word 'recovery' is unwarranted. As foreclosures continue, many citizens are scared off of buying altogether. By renting, citizens are avoiding potentially owing a mortgage that is more than the house's worth.

Decreasing Property Value
Property values go up and down, and while this may affect homeowners in a big way, it does not affect renters. Home value determines the amount of property taxes you pay, the amount of your mortgage and more. In a rocky housing market, renters are not as adversely affected.

Flexibility to Downsize
In today's economy, many people struggle to make ends meet. By renting, citizens have the option to downgrade into a more affordable living space at the end of their lease. When you are a homeowner, it is much more difficult to break free of an expensive house because of the fees involved with buying and selling a home.

Fixed Rent Amount
Rent amounts are fixed for the span of the lease agreement. While landlords can raise the rent with notice, you are able to budget more efficiently since you know the amount of rent you are required to pay. Meanwhile, mortgages and the amount of the property tax can fluctuate.

Lower Insurance Costs
While homeowners need to maintain a homeowner's insurance policy, renters would be wise to invest in a renter's insurance policy. Luckily for renters, renter's insurance is much cheaper and it covers quite a lot. The average cost of renter's insurance is just $12 per month, according to the Independent Insurance Agents and Brokers of America. Meanwhile, the average homeowner's insurance policy cost ranges between $25 to $80 per month.

Lower Utility Costs
With homes getting larger and larger, it is often much more affordable to heat and power an apartment or small rental home as opposed to a larger home. Rental properties typically have a more compact floor plan, and renters can expect lower utility costs.

The Bottom Line
While owning a home may be beneficial for citizens over a long period of time, for many people renting is the better option. There are plenty of examples that show how renting can save consumers a considerable amount of money. The choice of whether to rent or buy your own home is a personal one. Before making a hasty move, review the details and make the financial decision that is right for you and your family.

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