Have you studied the history of stocks in the U.S? Most people are aware of the crash in 1929 as well as the capital depreciation that occurred through 1932. Yet many may not be aware of the government stimulus in 1933 that helped the market soar 200% over the next four years. While the stimulus may have aided in pulling the markets higher in the absence of organic economic growth, stocks eventually tanked nearly 50% in a ferocious 1-year bear (3/10/1937-3/31/1938).

It is fair to say that the Federal Reserve’s zero percent rate policy coupled with trillions of electronically created dollars has had a hand in propping up the U.S. economy. Are you comfortable with the idea that they may transition to “normalizing” overnight lending rates? If so, why are the smallest company stocks in iShares Russell 2000 Microcap (IWC) collectively down more than 9% from their February highs? Why is IWC struggling below its 200-day trendline?

IWC 200

If the U.S. economic recovery is for real – if it no longer needs the benefit of extraordinary measures by the U.S. Federal Reserve – shouldn’t we see a steepening of the yield curve? Instead, long-term Treasury bonds have been highly coveted throughout 2014. Bond bulls clearly do not believe things will go well in the absence of Fed support. Bond believers could be wrong, of course. Yet what gives a U.S. stock bull the confidence to ignore the worrywarts who are winning with iShares 20+ Year Treasury (TLT)?

TLT 200

There are those who would say that U.S. stocks actually hit bear market percentage losses in 2011. Others can quibble about whether the S&P 500 or the Wilshire 5000 or another representative index fell 20% or more from its highs. However, it is certainly worth remembering that Europe’s recession, as well as fears of a financial collapse over sovereign debt woes, dragged down U.S. equities three years ago. Is it in any way disturbing that European monetary policy has failed to get the euro-zone economy expanding? Vanguard Europe (VGK) is back below its long-term moving average and it is 6% off its 52-week peak. Does the eroding faith in European stocks shake your faith in the U.S. stock market?

VGK 200

If you do believe the U.S. economy is part of a worldwide economy, are you bothered by capital depreciation across the commodity space? U.S. equities thrived alongside commodity demand in the previous decade; they faltered in the absence of that demand during the two previous recessions. Is the downtrend for PowerShares DB Commodity Tracking Index Fund (DBC) perplexing in any shape or form?

DBC 200

Analysts at SG Securities estimate that corporations spent 20% last quarter on share buybacks. Recognizing that share buybacks reduce supply – understanding that corporate purchases have been a part of the demand side of the equation – does the change ring any alarm bells? There are scores of different methods for determining whether stocks are undervalued, fairly values or overvalued. Most of those methods scream overvaluation. Why should an investor with cash on hand add more U.S. equity exposure when tired-and-true metrics suggest waiting for cheaper prices?

Some stock bulls have argued that we are in the pre-season of a merger-and-acquisition phase. Moreover, with the biggest banks profiting from their government-infused capital structure, one might reasonably assume that regional banks would benefit from takeover fever. Heck, shouldn’t shares of regional banks be surging on the “healthy” demand for real estate? Yet SPDR KBW Regional Banking (KRE) is not showing any stamina.

KRE 200

Having asked so many questions of U.S. stock ETF bulls, one might erroneously assume that I am bearish. On the contrary. Until large-cap stock ETFs in the S&P 500 fall below a 200-day moving average, the trend suggests that one should participate. Yet throughout the year, I have drilled home two key points: (1) Use a barbell approach and (2) Have a sell strategy in place. The ETFs that I am using for that barbell include Vanguard Extended Duration (EDV) and iShares USA Minimum Volatility (USMV).

Disclosure Statement: ETF Expert is a web log (”blog”) that makes the world of ETFs easier to understand. Gary Gordon, MS, CFP is the president of Pacific Park Financial, Inc., a Registered Investment Adviser with the SEC. Gary Gordon, Pacific Park Financial, Inc., and/or its clients may hold positions in the ETFs, mutual funds, and/or any investment asset mentioned above. The commentary does not constitute individualized investment advice. The opinions offered herein are not personalized recommendations to buy, sell or hold securities. At times, issuers of exchange-traded products compensate Pacific Park Financial, Inc. or its subsidiaries for advertising at the ETF Expert web site. ETF Expert content is created independently of any advertising relationship.

Related Articles
  1. Investing

    The ABCs of Bond ETF Distributions

    How do bond exchange traded fund (ETF) distributions work? It’s a question I get a lot. First, let’s explain what we mean by distributions.
  2. Investing Basics

    Are ETFs the Best Way to Diversify with Bonds?

    Are bonds safe or risky right now? It depends on the type of bond and how you invest in them.
  3. Investing Basics

    How to Use Boring CDs to Diversify

    Markets are volatile and are in for more punishment. CDs can help investors earn some interest while they're waiting out the storm.
  4. Investing Basics

    Top Tips for Diversifying with Exotic Currencies

    Is there an opportunity in exotic currencies right now, or are you safer sticking to the major ones?
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The 3 Biggest Mutual Fund Companies in the US

    Compare and contrast the rise of America's big three institutional asset managers: BlackRock Funds, The Vanguard Group and State Street Global Advisors.
  6. Investing

    Breaking Down the Federal Reserve's Dual Mandate

    The Fed has been tasked with a dual mandate by Congress to achieve monetary stability. We explain what the dual mandate is and what it means.
  7. Professionals

    5 Top-Rated Funds for Your Retirement Portfolio

    Mutual funds are a good choice for emotional investors. Here are five popular funds to consider.
  8. Investing News

    Are Stocks Cheap Now? Nope. And Here's Why

    Are stocks cheap right now? Be wary of those who are telling you what you want to hear. Here's why.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The 4 Best Buy-and-Hold ETFs

    Explore detailed analyses of the top buy-and-hold exchange traded funds, and learn about their characteristics, statistics and suitability.
  10. Chart Advisor

    Bumpy Roads Ahead In Transportation

    Investors are keeping an eye on the transportation industry. We'll take a look at the trend direction and how to trade it.
  1. What are the risks of annuities in a recession?

    Annuities come in several forms, the two most common being fixed annuities and variable annuities. During a recession, variable ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are high yield bonds a good investment?

    Bonds are rated according to their risk of default by independent credit rating agencies such as Moody's, Standard & ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do mutual funds invest only in stocks?

    Mutual funds invest in stocks, but certain types also invest in government and corporate bonds. Stocks are subject to the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Can mutual funds invest in IPOs?

    Mutual funds can invest in initial public offerings (IPOS). However, most mutual funds have bylaws that prevent them from ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is the Federal Reserve audited?

    Contrary to conventional wisdom, the Federal Reserve is extensively audited. Politicians on the left and right of a populist ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Who decides when to print money in the US?

    The U.S. Treasury decides to print money in the United States as it owns and operates printing presses. However, the Federal ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  2. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
  3. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  4. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  5. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  6. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!