Real estate investment trusts, or REITs, have come a long way from the drubbing they experienced this time last year. The Fed induced taper tantrum led to a significant sell off in these income-generating vehicles that was primarily driven by rising interest rates and the fear of a slowing real estate market.

The majority of REIT ETFs fell between 15-20% in a two month time frame that culminated in an excellent opportunity for value-seeking investors to purchase these funds at attractive price points and much higher yields. Since that sell-off, we have seen a complete price retracement back to the prior highs as yield-hungry buyers have stepped back into the real estate game.

One of the attractive attributes of REITs is they are considered an alternative asset class with different risks and growth drivers than traditional stocks and bonds. This makes them an excellent opportunity to diversify your portfolio in an unconventional asset class, in addition to adding a much higher yield than the average dividend paying stock. In fact, REITs are generally required to pay out the majority of their taxable income as dividends to shareholders.

In terms of size, the largest and most heavily traded ETF in this space is the Vanguard REIT ETF (VNQ). This fund is comprised of 137 publicly traded REITs with a total portfolio size of $23.1 billion. The top two holdings in the market-cap weighted VNQ include Simon Property Group (SPG) and Public Storage (PSA). However, the fund is widely diversified in a number of hotel, healthcare, office, retail, and residential REITs.

Probably the most attractive quality of VNQ over similar broad-based real estate competitors such as the iShares Real Estate ETF (IYR) is its miniscule expense ratio. VNQ currently charges a tiny 0.10% management fee compared to 0.46% for IYR. The only lower cost vehicle in its class is the Schwab U.S. REIT ETF (SCHH), which touts an expense ratio of just 0.07% annually.

VNQ has an effective yield of 3.70% based on the most recent distribution and income is paid quarterly to shareholders. So far this year, VNQ has gained 17.01% as the combination of favorable real estate data and falling interest rates have been a tail wind for higher prices.

REITs are often very sensitive to changes in interest rates because their financing and acquisition costs are heavily reliant on a favorable yield environment. Investors typically shun REITs in a rising rate environment because the additional risks you assume to own these companies versus other income opportunities become less attractive as bond yields rise.

While the majority of ETF assets in this space are focused on domestic REITs, there are also numerous international and sector-specific offerings that are intriguing as well.

The SPDR Dow Jones International Real Estate ETF (RWX) is the largest fund by assets focused on overseas REIT holdings. RWX has over $4.7 billion allocated to 136 foreign REITs with the largest country allocations being Japan, United Kingdom, and Australia. The dividend yield on RWX is listed at 4.43% as of the most recent distribution.

Another top international competitor is the Vanguard Global Ex-U.S. Real Estate ETF (VNQI). This ETF represents REITs in over 30 countries which include both developed and emerging market names. The VNQI portfolio is also much broader, with 551 holdings representing $1.4 billion in total assets.

International REITs can be an excellent way to diversify your exposure outside of the U.S. dollar and into burgeoning real estate opportunities abroad. However, both RWX and VNQI have lagged their domestic counterparts this year in total return. RWX has gained 8.98% and VNQI has increased 6.91% half way through 2014.

Blackrock also offers targeted regional international REIT exposure via the iShares Asia Developed Real Estate (IFAS) and iShares Europe Developed Real Estate (IFEU). Because real estate trends can develop in independent geographical areas, these funds allow you to hone in on more specific foreign countries according to your investment thesis.

If you want more targeted domestic REITs, the answer might lie in sector-specific offerings. There are several ETFs that are focused on industrial, residential, and retail companies that allow you to access opportunities in these niche areas. Each particular sector may perform better or worse than an aggregate index such as VNQ depending on the fundamental drivers for each theme.

For example, the iShares Residential Real Estate Capped ETF (REZ) is an ETF that invests in only residential, healthcare, and public storage companies. It is currently sitting on a 2014 unrealized gain of 19.84%, which bests nearly every fund in its class.

The Bottom Line

The ETF universe has never been so inviting to income investors that are looking for diversified ways to enhance their portfolio yield. The plethora of options available allows you to hone in on the type and style of REIT ETF that meets your unique needs. In addition, many brokerage companies have several of these ETFs listed on their transaction-free schedules, which may help you decide which fund is most appropriate.

No matter how you slice it, REIT ETFs can offer uncorrelated returns with excellent yields during a surging real estate or falling interest rate environment.

FMD Capital Management, its executives, and/or its clients may hold positions in the ETFs, mutual funds or any investment asset mentioned in this article. The commentary does not constitute individualized investment advice. The opinions offered herein are not personalized recommendations to buy, sell or hold securities.

Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    Using Your IRA to Invest in Property

    Explain how to use an IRA account to buy investment property.
  2. Chart Advisor

    Now Could Be The Time To Buy IPOs

    There has been lots of hype around the IPO market lately. We'll take a look at whether now is the time to buy.
  3. Stock Analysis

    Why did Wal-Mart's Stock Take a Fall in 2015?

    Wal-Mart is the largest company in the world, with a sterling track-record of profits and dividends. So why has its stock fallen sharply in 2015?
  4. Home & Auto

    Economics of Owning a Rental Property

    Learn how to find suitably priced rental property and the right rent level. Determine what maintenance costs to expect and what tax breaks are available.
  5. Investing News

    Should You Invest in Disney Stock Before Star Wars?

    The force is strong with Disney stock, as it continues to make gains going into the launch of EP7. But is this pricey stock a good buy at these levels?
  6. Investing News

    Silicon Valley Startups Fly into Space

    Space enthusiasts are in for an exciting time as Silicon Valley startups take on the lucrative but expensive final frontier.
  7. Chart Advisor

    Copper Continues Its Descent

    Copper prices have been under pressure lately and based on these charts it doesn't seem that it will reverse any time soon.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Buying Vanguard Mutual Funds Vs. ETFs

    Learn about the differences between Vanguard's mutual fund and ETF products, and discover which may be more appropriate for investors.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETFs Vs. Mutual Funds: Choosing For Your Retirement

    Learn about the difference between using mutual funds versus ETFs for retirement, including which investment strategies and goals are best served by each.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The 8 Most Popular Vanguard Funds for a 401(k)

    Learn about some of the mutual funds in Vanguard's lineup that are popular among 401(k) investors, and find out why you should consider them.
  1. How liquid are Vanguard mutual funds?

    The Vanguard mutual fund family is one of the largest and most well-recognized fund family in the financial industry. Its ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Should mutual funds be subject to more regulation?

    Mutual funds, when compared to other types of pooled investments such as hedge funds, have very strict regulations. In fact, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do mutual funds work in India?

    Mutual funds in India work in much the same way as mutual funds in the United States. Like their American counterparts, Indian ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Are UTMA accounts escheatable?

    Like most financial assets held by institutions such as banks and investment firms, UTMA accounts can be escheated by state ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the dormancy and escheatment rules for stock accounts?

    While the specific dormancy and escheatment rules for stock accounts vary by state, all states provide for the escheatment ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Does mutual fund manager tenure matter?

    Mutual fund investors have numerous items to consider when selecting a fund, including investment style, sector focus, operating ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  2. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  3. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  4. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
  5. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and ...
  6. Indemnity

    Indemnity is compensation for damages or loss. Indemnity in the legal sense may also refer to an exemption from liability ...
Trading Center