1. World's Wackiest Stock Indicators

    Can butter production help you predict the market's next move? Find out here.
  2. Top 9 Vacation Destinations For Wall Street Geeks

    Indulge your inner geek with one of these financial-themed holiday getaways.
  3. Iron Condors Fly On Fragile Wings

    Do the rewards outweigh the risks for this trading strategy? Read on to find out.
  4. Asset Protection For The Business Owner

    Could incorporating your business help protect it? Find out here.
  5. Immunization Inoculates Against Interest Rate Risk

    Big-money investors can hedge against bond portfolio losses caused by rate fluctuations.
  6. 5 ATM Scams That Can Break The Bank

    Don't get scorched by ATM thieves who want to burn a hole in your wallet.
  7. Top 9 Venture Capital Interview Questions

    Ace your interview by learning how to break down the most common questions asked.
  8. 10 Steps To Retire A Millionaire

    Making this dream come true takes work, but it's well worth the effort.
  9. House Your Retirement With Self-Directed Real Estate IRAs

    Investors are now able to invest directly in real property, mortgages and other assets.
  10. Giants Of Finance: John Maynard Keynes

    This rock star of economics advocated government intervention at a time of free-market thinking.
  11. Life Lesson No. 1: Avoid College Scholarship Fraud

    When families get desperate to scrape together college funds, they may fall prey to scammers.
  12. Bear Spray For Your 401(k)

    You can defend your retirement savings from the ravages of a bear market. We'll show you how.
  13. The Challenging Role Of The Corporate Treasurer

    Corporate treasury management has evolved from an offshoot of accounting to a more specific and strategic career.
  14. What is earnings management?

    Before diving into what earnings management is, it is important to have a solid understanding of what we mean when we refer to earnings. Earnings are the profits of a company. Investors and analysts look to earnings to determine the attractiveness of a particular stock.
  15. What kinds of investments are allowed in a qualified retirement plan, and what kinds ...

    Generally, the permissible investments for qualified plans include publicly-traded securities, real estate, mutual funds and money market funds. Some plans even allow investment of options. To be sure, always refer to the plan document which will provide a description of the investment options under ...
  16. What's the difference between publicly- and privately-held companies?

    Privately-held companies are - no surprise here - privately held. This means that, in most cases, the company is owned by the company's founders, management or a group of private investors. A public company, on the other hand, is a company that has sold a portion of itself to the public via an initial ...
  17. Why do some closed-end mutual funds trade above or below their net asset values?

    Intuition tells us that a mutual fund's net asset value (NAV) (the net value of all assets within the mutual fund's portfolio divided by the number of outstanding shares) should be identical to its market price, but often, the market price of a closed-end mutual fund (a fund with a fixed number of issued ...
  18. Where did the bull and bear market get their names?

    First of all, let's remember that bears are sluggish and bulls spirited and burly. The terms are used to describe general actions and attitudes, or sentiment, either of an individual (bear and bull) or the market. A bear market refers to a decline in prices, usually for a period of a few months, in a ...
  19. How does FINRA differ from the SEC?

    With all the financial organizations out there, knowing what they all do can be as complicated as knowing where to invest. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) - formerly, the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) - are two of ...
  20. Are certificates of deposit a kind of bond?

    There is a fair amount of overlap between certificates of deposit (CDs) and bonds; they are both fixed-income securities, which you generally hold on to until maturity. Simply put, you put your money into a CD or bond for a set period, and you know exactly what you will receive when that time is up.
  21. What is the difference between the Dow and the Nasdaq?

    Because of the way people throw around the words "Dow" and "Nasdaq," both terms have become synonymous with "the market," giving people a hazy idea of what each term actually means. In this question, "the Dow" refers to the famous figure that peppers almost all business news reports: the Dow Jones Industrial ...
  22. The Stop-Loss Order - Make Sure You Use It

    It's a simple but powerful tool to help you implement your stock-investment strategy. Find out how.
  23. My Traditional IRA has been converted to a Roth IRA. Can I still make a qualified ...

    If you converted the funds less than five-years ago, you will not be able to meet the qualified distribution requirements. However, the amount you distribute for use toward the acquisition of a first home will not be subject to the 10% early-distribution penalty.
  24. How do you calculate the percentage gain or loss on an investment?

    Calculating the percentage change of your investment is quite easy. All it takes is a little bookkeeping and either a simple calculator or a pad of paper for doing the long division. Here is what you need to do:Take amount that you have gained on the investment and divide it by the amount invested.
  25. What is a treasury stock?

    Every company has an authorized amount of stock it can issue legally. Of this amount, the total number of shares owned by investors, including the company's officers and insiders (the owners of restricted stock), is known as the shares outstanding. The number available only to the public to buy and sell ...
  26. What is a DRIP?

    The word "DRIP" is an acronym for "dividend reinvestment plan", but "DRIP" also happens to describe the way the plan works. With DRIPs, the dividends that an investor receives from a company go toward the purchase of more stock, making the investment in the company grow little by little.
  27. What is a CUSIP number?

    CUSIP stands for Committee on Uniform Securities Identification Procedures. Formed in 1962, this committee developed a system (implemented in 1967) that identifies securities, specifically U.S. and Canadian registered stocks, and U.S. government and municipal bonds.
  28. What is the carbon trade?

    The carbon trade came about in response to the Kyoto Protocol. Signed in Kyoto, Japan, by some 180 countries in December 1997, the Kyoto Protocol calls for 38 industrialized countries to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions between the years 2008 to 2012 to levels that are 5.2% lower than those of 199 ...
  29. What are the "Dogs of the Dow"?

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) is an index of 30 of the most significant, mature and respected companies in the world. Investing in the index itself over the long term is a fairly sensible strategy. The "Dogs of the Dow" is a variation on this strategy developed in 1972 in an attempt to beat ...
  30. Do hedge funds and mutual funds invest in commodities in high inflation environments?

    Hedge funds and mutual funds are very different types of investment vehicles.The contents of a hedge fund are determined by the hedge fund manager and the investment guidelines set out by the financial institution he or she works for, if there is one.
  31. What's the difference between a regular option and an exotic option?

    Before learning about exotic options, you should have a fairly good understanding of regular options. Both types of options share the idea of having the right to buy or sell an asset in the future, but the way investors realize profits using these options can differ dramatically.
  32. Designating A Trust As Retirement Beneficiary

    Designating a trust as your IRA beneficiary can be beneficial, but it requires proper planning to avoid problems.
  33. Why do you need a margin account to short sell stocks?

    The reason that margin accounts and only margin accounts can be used to short sell stocks has to do with Regulation T, a rule instituted by the Federal Reserve Board. This rule is motivated by the nature of the short sale transaction itself and the potential risks that come with short selling.
  34. I hold stock certificates in a company that just had a stock split. What happens ...

    The short answer is that a stock split will have little effect on the holder of stock certificates. In most cases when an investor purchases shares in a company, they are never actually held in paper form by the investor or the investor's brokerage firm.
  35. Can technical analysis be called a self-fulfilling prophecy?

    This has been a topic of much controversy since the invention of technical analysis, and it remains a very heated debate. A self-fulfilling prophecy is an event that is caused only by the preceding prediction or expectation that it was going to occur.
  36. Avoiding Mistakes In Required Minimum Distributions (RMD)

    If you don't calculate your required minimum distributions accurately, you might have to pay an excise tax.
  37. Short selling vs. purchasing a put option: how do the payoffs differ?

    Purchasing a put option and entering into a short sale transaction are the two most common ways for traders to profit when the price of an underlying asset decreases, but the payoffs are quite different. Even though both of these instruments appreciate in value when the price of the underlying asset ...
  38. Can investment real estate be purchased within an IRA and, if so, are there any pitfalls?

    Investment real estate can be purchased with an IRA provided the investment does not violate the prohibited transaction rules.An individual may want to check with the IRA custodian to determine whether this is an option, as not all custodians allow for such investments.
  39. I participate in a profit-sharing plan at work. If I retire at age 62, will I be ...

    The money in your profit-sharing account will be taxable when it is withdrawn from the account. You may leave the money in the plan (if the plan allows it) or roll over the balance to an IRA.Most financial planners would recommend that you do not leave the funds in the profit-sharing plan after you leave ...
  40. I didn't record my Traditional IRA contributions. Is there a website that lists ...

    Visit the Congressional Budget Office's Online Tax Guide, which summarizes IRA contribution limits and phase-out ranges for every year from 1974 onwards. You may also want to ensure that you file Form 8606 for any year in which you made non-deductible contributions to your Traditional IRA.
  41. What are the components of the risk premium for investments?

    The risk premium is the excess return above the risk-free rate that investors require as compensation for the higher uncertainty associated with risky assets. The five main risks that comprise the risk premium are business risk, financial risk, liquidity risk, exchange-rate risk and country-specific ...
  42. What will happen to my U.S.-based stock portfolio if the U.S. dollar substantially ...

    The effect of a significant depreciation in the value of the U.S. dollar on the value of an investor's U.S-based portfolio is very much a function of the portfolio's contents. In other words, if the dollar declines substantially in value against a number of other currencies, your portfolio might be worth ...
  43. I want to buy a stock at $30, sell when it reaches $35, don't want to hang on to ...

    Once you've identified a security that you want to purchase, you need to determine a price at which you want to sell if the price heads in an adverse direction and a price at which you want to take profits when the price moves in your favor. In many cases, this data is relayed to the broker using three ...
  44. Does issuing preferred shares offer a tax advantage for corporations?

    There is no direct tax advantage to the issuing of preferred shares when compared to other forms of financing such as common shares or debt. The reason for this is that preferred shares, which are a form of equity, are paid fixed dividends with after-tax dollars.
  45. Where can I find information about pre- and after-hours trading on the NYSE and the ...

    The stock market, particularly the NYSE and Nasdaq, is traditionally open between 9:30am and 4pm EST. Over time, with the adoption of new technology and increases in demand for trading, these hours have been extended to include what is known as pre- and after-hours trading.
  46. I have some stocks in a taxable account. Can I use them to fund my Roth IRA instead ...

    Regular IRA contributions must be made in cash. Contributions of securities are not allowed. Internal Revenue Code Section § 219(e)(1) and IRS Publication 590 provide detailed information about IRA contribution rules.Exceptions apply to rollover contributions if the same security was distributed.For ...
  47. Can a bond have a negative yield?

    The return a bond provides to an investor is measured by its yield, which is quoted as a percentage. Current yield is a commonly quoted yield calculation, used to evaluate the return on a bond for a one-year period. It only accounts for the interest, or coupon payments, that the bond returns to investors.
  48. How do I calculate the adjusted closing price for a stock?

    When trading is done for the day on a recognized exchange, all stocks are priced at close. The price that is quoted at the end of the trading day is the price of the last lot of stock that was traded for the day. This is called a stock's closing price.
  49. Saving Money With A Private Annuity Trust

    Learn about a strategy that could help you reduce taxes, diversify your portfolio and generate income.
  50. What happens if a company doesn't think it will collect on some of its receivables?

    The accounts receivable account, or receivables for short, is created when a company extends credit to a customer based on a sale. However, there are times when a company will not collect on a particular sale, and the company must account for this on its financial statements.
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